Kizuna 2020: Bondad y solidaridad nikkei durante la pandemia de COVID-19

En japonés, kizuna significa fuertes vínculos emocionales. 

En el 2011, habíamos invitado a nuestra comunidad nikkei global a colaborar con una serie especial sobre cómo las comunidades nikkei respondieron y apoyaron a Japón tras el terremoto y tsunami de Tohoku. Ahora, nos gustaría reunir historias sobre cómo las familias y comunidades nikkei se han visto afectadas y cómo están respondiendo y adaptándose a esta crisis mundial. 

Si te gustaría participar, revisa nuestras pautas de presentación. Recibimos artículos en inglés, japonés, español y/o portugués. Estamos buscando distintas historias de todo el mundo. Esperamos que estas historias ayuden a conectarnos, creando una cápsula del tiempo de respuestas y perspectivas de nuestra comunidad Nima-kai global para el futuro.

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Aunque muchos eventos en todo el mundo han sido cancelados debido a la pandemia del COVID-19, hemos visto que se están organizando muchos nuevos eventos únicamente online. Como son eventos online, cualquier persona puede participar desde cualquier parte del mundo. Si tu organización nikkei está preparando un evento virtual, ¡publícalo en la sección Eventos de Descubra a los Nikkei! Además, compartiremos los eventos en Twitter (@discovernikkei). Esperamos esto nos ayude a conectarnos en nuevas maneras, aún si todos estamos aislados en nuestros hogares.

 

 

identity en

The Karma of Becoming American

In the section under COVID-19 safety precautions, the Department of Homeland Security letter addressed to me mandated facemasks and banned guests for my newly re-scheduled naturalization ceremony. Given fears that the virus might serve as a pretext for a complete shutdown of immigration and naturalization, it was a huge relief to find out that the ceremony would take place at all. The original date for the ceremony had been scheduled for March 19, the very day that California governor Newsom issued a statewide stay-at-home order.

I had always imagined this conclusion of a long path towards citizenship would take place ...

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food en

Nikkei Ramen-ya: Fresh-made Noodles and Living Wages in the Heart of the Comox Valley

When Greg Masuda and his wife Erin opened Courtenay’s first ramen shop in the fall of 2016, it was welcomed with open arms by the residents of this small British Columbia town nestled in the heart of the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island.

Nikkei Ramen-ya, located in a former jewelry shop, serves their own handmade noodles, made daily. Frequent experimentation, and specials like ebi ramen, made with wild sidestripe shrimp and local pea shoots, have ensured that the menu stays varied, and made the shop a hit with customers. A visit to their online ordering page reveals ten kinds ...

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community en

Taking Flight After The Tumult

Little Tokyo and yearning for meaning and hope in the power of place.

A bird taking flight.

Little Tokyo is a small neighborhood of artists and activists, of commerce and spirituality, of parades and protests, densely layered by its long history and its proximity to the seats of power.

And so, in early June, Nihonmachi, wounded by a week of turbulence and tumult that has shaken an entire nation, took to the task of rebuilding and reforming a community. Summoning up, once again, those reserves of resiliency that have served the Japanese American community for so many generations.

Individuals, each ...

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Pilates Keeps Centenarian Healthy During Quarantine

TORONTO — On Nisei Masako Okawara‘s birthday, she looked out the window to see her two granddaughters and their families in the parking lot of her North Scarborough condo next to a sign reading, “Happy 100th Birthday!”

The rest of the day was filled with phone calls, flower deliveries, and a zoom video conference call with friends and family singing Happy Birthday, while she blew out the candle on an ice cream treat. Her five grandchildren made virtual flowers, since Okawara loves flowers, as one of the original members of the Toronto Ikenobo Ikebana Society.

It was not the way ...

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George Freeth, the Village of Maikura, and the 1918-1920 Pandemic

In December 1908, at the age of 25, the “father of surfing” George Freeth saved the lives of nine Japanese American and two Russian American fishermen off Venice beach when a violent Pacific storm lashed the coast. For his heroic actions, Freeth was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for bravery.

In April 1919, at the age of 35, the Hawaiian-born Freeth—noted for his physical fitness and still in his prime—died after a long battle with the flu virus spreading across the globe. He was the first person to surf the Huntington Beach pier at its re-dedication in 1914 ...

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