Jonathan van Harmelen

Jonathan van Harmelen estudia actualmente un doctorado (Ph.D) en historia en la Universidad de California en Santa Cruz, con especialización en la historia del encarcelamiento japonés-americano. Es licenciado en historia e idioma francés por la Universidad Pomona y ha completado una maestría en humanidades en la Universidad de Georgetown. Entre el 2015 y el 2018, Jonathan había trabajado para el Museo Nacional de Historia Americana como pasante e investigador. Puede ser contactado al email jvanharm@ucsc.edu.

Última actualización en febrero de 2020

war en

William Denman: A Voice of Dissent on the Courts - Part 2

Read Part 1 >> Throughout the war years, Denman would cross swords with DeWitt and the Western Defense Command in the test cases against the wartime exclusion of Japanese Americans. The first major case to approach the bench of the 9th Circuit, however, was the lawsuit Regan vs. King. Spearheaded by the Native Sons of the Golden West, who were represented by former California attorney general and noted anti-Asian activist Ulysses S. Webb, the lawsuit’s goal was to prevent Nisei voters held in camp from voting in the August 1942 California primaries. More broadly, the plaintiffs...

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William Denman: A Voice of Dissent on the Courts - Part 1

The U.S. judicial system, by and large, failed to protect the rights of the Japanese American community during World War II. Although the Justice Department, led by Attorney General Francis Biddle, opposed the forced removal of U.S. citizens of Japanese ancestry, in the end President Roosevelt approved mass removal, leading to mass incarceration. As Peter Irons noted in his landmark study Justice At War, the Supreme Court’s subsequent rulings in the cases of Gordon Hirabayashi, Minoru Yasui, and Fred Korematsu, during which the government suppressed and manipulated evidence, represent...

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Saving the Voices of the Past: An Interview with Arthur Hansen

On June 4, 2022, the Japanese American National Museum will host an event in celebration of the publication of Yoshito Kuromiya’s edited memoir, Beyond the Betrayal: The Memoir of a World War II Japanese American Draft Resister of Conscience. As one of the few firsthand accounts of the Heart Mountain Draft Resisters, Kuromiya’s memoir is an important text that documents the personal views of one of the famed resisters. Beyond the Betrayal’s editor and distinguished historian Art Hansen, along with famed Sansei poet Lawson Inada, will join the Kuromiya family in a convers...

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Daisuke Kitagawa: Civil Rights and Anti-Racism Activist — Part 2

Read Part 1 >> Throughout the postwar years, Reverend Kitagawa remained in Minneapolis, where he maintained an active voice in local affairs as an expert on race relations while working for the Federal Council of Churches. In February 1946, Professor Frank Rarig of the University of Minnesota interviewed Reverend Kitagawa for a local Minneapolis radio station. During the interview, Kitagawa referenced forced removal of Japanese Americans, stating that the community had faced wrongful persecution, but he praised the members’ successful adjustment to their new lives in Minneapoli...

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Daisuke Kitagawa: Civil Rights and Anti-Racism Activist — Part 1

Throughout Japanese American history, a number of individuals have mobilized in response to incidents of racism facing their community. Along with calling for the end of anti-Japanese discrimination, a smaller number of Japanese American activists, of whom Yuri Kochiyama is perhaps the most prominent, have willingly connected their own experiences to broader issues of civil rights, by joining forces with African Americans. Several of these individuals have found their advocacy inspired by their spiritual duty to advocate for equal treatment of all races. Reverend Kyoshiro Tokunaga described...

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