Crónicas Nikkei 8 — Héroes Nikkei: Pioneros, Modelos a Seguir e Inspiraciones

La palabra “héroe” puede significar diferentes cosas para diferentes personas. Para esta serie, hemos explorado la idea de lo que es un héroe nikkei y de lo que esto significa para diversas personas. ¿Quién es tu héroe? ¿Cuál es su historia? y ¿de qué manera ha influido en tu identidad nikkei o tu conexión con tu herencia nikkei?

Les pedimos historias desde mayo hasta septiembre de 2019, y la votación concluyó el 12 de noviembre de 2019. Todas las 32 historias (16 en inglés, 2 en japonés, 11 en español y 3 en portugués) que recibimos desde Argentina, Australia, Brasil, Canadá, Japón, los Estados Unidos, México y Perú.

Aquí están las historias favoritas seleccionadas por nuestro comité editorial y la comunidad Nima-kai. 


Las elegidas del Comité Editorial:

La elegida por Nima-Kai:

Para saber más sobre este proyecto de escritura >>


Mira también estas series de Crónicas Nikkei:

#1: ¡ITADAKIMASU! Sabores de la cultura nikkei 
#2: Nikkei+ ~ Historias de Lenguaje, Tradiciones, Generaciones y Raza Mixtos ~
#3: Nombres Nikkei: ¿Taro, John, Juan, João?
#4: La Familia Nikkei: Memorias, Tradiciones, y Valoress
#5: Nikkei-go: El idioma de la familia, la comunidad y la cultura
#6: ¡Itadakimasu 2! Otros sabores de la cultura nikkei
#7: Raíces Nikkei: Indagando en Nuestra Herencia Cultural

war en

My Hero: Shinya Honda

Shinya Honda was my hero because he never looked back. He always persevered and took responsibility for his own life and even took care of his mother and three sisters. Uncle Shin never complained about his circumstances or the terrible events that took place at the age of 15, when his father died.

Above all, I am grateful to Uncle Shin and his whole generation who worked hard to serve our country. In spite of the incarceration in concentration camps and this tragic black mark in American history, the positive attitude of Uncle Shin, being a cheerleader for his children ...

lea más

community en

2 Presidents, 2 Senators, 2 Moms…and 2 Dads, too

My best friend Brenda and I have often talked about how much change and history our parents witnessed over the course of their lifetimes. We are the only-children, daughters of U.S. military fathers who were born and raised in the American South and Japanese mothers.

Our parents lived through much of the history of the 20th century, and we too, as their daughters also are living witnesses to that history.

Beginning in 1985, I had the great privilege of serving as a press aide to two of Tennessee’s U.S. Senators in Washington, D.C. As a high ...

lea más

identity en

A Moment in Time

As I gazed upon my mom’s old wooden hand mirror, I found that time has not been kind to my face. There were noticeable lines across my forehead, wrinkles around the corners of my mouth and dark spots of old age.

Whenever I held my dad’s old broken wrist watch against the windowpane, I noticed that time had stopped at 10:30 a.m. The face on the watch was made of glass which was dome shaped and tinted yellow with age. The numerals on its face were from 1-12, 13-24 by the hour and 5-60 by the ...

lea más

war en

The Hero I Never Met

My hero Is my late father-in-law Yoneto James Nakata. He was the father of my wife, Mary Nakata. She asked me to research her father’s life as she never knew him because he died when she was only six months old.

Over a period of 30 years, I came to know him through the few documents that Mary had. Yoneto Nakata was born in Sanger, California on November 25, 1918 to immigrants from Hiroshima, Japan. They worked in the San Joaquin Valley as farm workers, picking fruits such as grapes and peaches. But in 1925, his parents along with ...

lea más

community en

A Full Immersion in Today’s LA (Area) Japanese American Community

Being of only Japanese ancestry and growing up in the South Bay (Torrance) I have never questioned whether or not I belonged to the Japanese American community. My generational identity is that I am Yonsei (fraternal) and Shin Nisei (maternal), which put me in situations where I am more “Japanese” than my Yonsei friends, but not “Japanese” enough to really be a Nisei.

The social outlets that I found myself participating in within the JA community was playing basketball, doing Girl Scouts, and dancing hula. Although I do not practice Buddhism, a family summer tradition has always been to go ...

lea más