Keiko Fukuda

Keiko Fukuda nasceu na província de Oita, se formou na Universidade Católica Internacional e trabalhou num editorial de revistas informativas em Tókio. Em 1992 imigrou aos EUA e trabalhou como editora chefe numa revista dedicada a comunidade japonesa. Em 2003 decidiu trabalhar como ¨free-lance¨ e, atualmente, escreve artigos para revistas focalizando entrevistas a personalidades.  Publicou junto a outros escritores o “Nihon ni Umarete” (Nascido no Japão) da editora Hankyuu Comunicações. Website: https://angeleno.net 

Atualizado em julho de 2020 

community en ja

The History of Japanese Americans from the Perspective of a German-American: Mr. Nahan Gluck, docent for the Japanese American National Museum – Part 2 “Teaching Students And Going to Internment Camp Sites”

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After retiring from a Los Angeles County job in 1992 and seeing actual barracks from the Heart Mountain Internment Camp, Mr. Nahan Gluck started volunteering at the Japanese American National Museum in 1994. He is not of Japanese descent.

However, filled with indignation that as a fellow American and as a fellow human being, ‘even one more person should know about the Japanese American history’, Nahan has been coming to the museum for more than twice a week for the last 14 years.

At first, he started as a gallery guide for Fighting For Tomorrow, an exhibit about ...

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community en ja

The History of Japanese Americans from the Perspective of a German American: Mr. Nahan Gluck, docent for the Japanese American National Museum - Part 1 “Why am I different if I am an American as well?”

I am a Shin Issei—born in Japan, a first generation Japanese American. It has been 17 years since I came to the United States. During that time, I have interviewed many Nikkei. I had several opportunities to visit the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo when it was still using the old Higashi Hongwanji Temple building.

Through my 17 years of experiences living here, I have gained an unwavering respect towards the Japanese Americans who have built a strong foundation for us so that we are able to live in this country now without problems. However, if I ...

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migration en ja

Records of a Japanese woman married to a Kibei-Nisei: Masako Kato of Montebello, California - Part 3 Peaceful retirement life, and our grandson continuing on the restaurant path

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After the war, Masako had left Japan to marry Kato Mitsuo, successor to the once prominent Daruma Café in Little Tokyo. However, just five years after her arrival in the US and despite the couple’s heavy investment into renovating the restaurant, they were run out of business by the property owner who designated the restaurant building for demolition for a city-wide redevelopment.

Thereafter, they opened a Japanese restaurant near their residence in Montebello for two years until Masako’s parents in Japan announced their plans to visit their daughter in America. Determined not to reveal the ...

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migration en ja

Records of a Japanese woman married to a Kibei-Nisei: Masako Kato of Montebello, California - Part 2 The switch from a wonderfully surreal new life to a path of bitter struggle

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A week after their meeting at Aiko Yamano’s home, Masako and Mitsuo Kato had their wedding. From their wedding album, one can tell how extremely luxurious of a wedding it must have been at the time.

Masako was outfitted in an edgy design made of lace, and her katsura (traditional headpiece) was a new-age creation made of netting, as opposed to the heavy, traditional pieces. On top of that, even the makeup for the bride was provided by Aiko herself, as she was a prominent figure in the beauty industry.

“At the time there were only ...

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migration en ja

Records of a Japanese woman married to a Kibei-Nisei: Masako Kato of Montebello, California - Part 1 Idolizing international marriage as an adolescent

The term “Nikkei American” consists of many different shapes and forms. Some Nikkei Americans are born and raised in America, and there are also “Kibei,” Nikkei Americans who are born in the US but leave their parents to go study in Japan and are essentially raised in Japan. Some are Nikkei Issei who are born in Japan and gain their US citizenship, and some Japanese join the Nikkei community by marriage to a Nikkei American.

I met Masako Kato of Montebello, California, who was the daughter of two Nikkei Issei parents and raised in Tokyo. Her father came stateside before ...

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