Keiko Fukuda

Keiko Fukuda nasceu na província de Oita, se formou na Universidade Católica Internacional e trabalhou num editorial de revistas informativas em Tókio. Em 1992 imigrou aos EUA e trabalhou como editora chefe numa revista dedicada a comunidade japonesa. Em 2003 decidiu trabalhar como ¨free-lance¨ e, atualmente, escreve artigos para revistas focalizando entrevistas a personalidades.  Publicou junto a outros escritores o “Nihon ni Umarete” (Nascido no Japão) da editora Hankyuu Comunicações. Website: https://angeleno.net 

Atualizado em julho de 2020 

community en ja

Sansei Japanese Sword Appraiser Mike Yamasaki – Part 2: It’s the Treasures of the Past That Make for a Bright Future

>> Part 1

Having repaired his grandmother’s swords since he was a boy, sansei Mike Yamasaki became an appraiser and connoisseur of Japanese swords. He carefully holds a “treasure” you couldn’t put a price on. Engraved with kanji for the word “Manzanar”, it is the dagger made at the Manzanar internment camp.

He encountered this dagger for the first time 8 years ago. A Caucasian man asked Mike for an appraisal. “For something made by an experienced craftsman, it was extremely rough. But that was because it was made in an environment without sufficient tools. When you consider the ...

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Sansei Japanese Sword Appraiser Mike Yamasaki – Part 1: Turning a Manzanar Dagger Into a Family Heirloom

I met with Mike one day around 10:00 am at a Japanese café in Little Tokyo. He had an appointment with a client in the morning and more meetings again that afternoon. His job? Appraiser of Japanese swords.

Mike is a sansei (third-generation Japanese) and is married to Mayumi, who was born in Japan. While I was exchanging email with Mayumi about “Toyo’s Camera”, a documentary about internment camp experiences, she wrote that “my husband has a dagger made at the Manzanar internment camp.” I immediately wanted to see the dagger and meet Mike.

We’ll discuss how ...

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The Story of a New Issei Who Flourished Inside the American Culinary Scene: Ryo Sato, living in South Pasadena, CA – Part 3 Helping bridge his Japanese hometown and America

>> Part 2

Having compiled a brilliant list of achievements as a French chef that would make anyone envious, the next goal for Mr. Sato was to have his own restaurant. “In the old days, most people didn’t open their own place once they became head chef at a good hotel or restaurant. But I had confidence in myself. When I decided to resign, everyone wondered why I would leave such a great place. But it was definitely my dream to have my own establishment, no matter how small. A dream is meaningless if you don’t make it a ...

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The Story of a Shin-Issei Who Flourished Inside the American Culinary Scene: Ryo Sato, living in South Pasadena, CA - Part 2 The first Japanese to be named head chef at a premiere LA restaurant

>> Part 1

Mr. Sato, a chef who went to Switzerland on an overseas program after the Tokyo Olympics, spent time in France and England before heading to America in 1971 to work at The Plaza Hotel in New York. After coming to the realization that “unlike Europe, American cooking was very loose and inexact”, he was invited to Chicago and headed there.

After a stint at Maxim’s Restaurant in Chicago, Mr. Sato moved to a restaurant called “95th”, starting work at its grand opening on the 95th floor of the John Hancock Center, which was the tallest building in ...

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The Story of a Shin-Issei Who Flourished Inside the American Culinary Scene: Ryo Sato, living in South Pasadena, CA – Part 1 Setting off to study cooking, inspired by the Tokyo Olympics

Until 2004, French cuisine chef, Ryo Sato, managed a restaurant named Chez Sato in Arcadia, outside of Los Angeles. Although well beyond the metropolitan area, it was an extremely popular French restaurant, with people more than willing to make the journey. Since moving in 2004 and shutting down the restaurant, he’s been active in volunteer work that is bringing together his Japanese hometown and his American home. At his home in South Pasadena, he looked back on his life up to now.

Each of the Shin-Issei who moved to America had his or her own reasons for leaving Japan ...

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