Crónicas Nikkei #10—Generaciones Nikkei: Conectando a Familias y Comunidades

La tema de la 10.° edición de Crónicas Nikkei—Generaciones Nikkei: Conectando a Familias y Comunidadesda una mirada a las relaciones intergeneracionales en las comunidades nikkei de todo el mundo, con especial atención a las nuevas generaciones más jóvenes de nikkei y cómo ellos se conectan (o no) con sus raíces y con las generaciones mayores.  

Les habíamos pedido historias relacionadas con las generaciones nikkei desde mayo hasta septiembre de 2021, y la votación concluyó el 8 de noviembre. Hemos recibido 31 historias (3 en español, 21 en inglés, 2 en japonés y 7 en portugués) provenientes de Australia, Brasil, Canadá, los Estados Unidos, Japón, Nueva Zelanda y Perú. Algunas historias fueron enviadas en múltiples idiomas.

Habíamos pedido a nuestro Comité Editorial que elija a sus favoritas. También nuestra comunidad Nima-kai votó por las historias que disfrutaron. ¡Aquí, presentamos las elecciones favoritas de los Comités Editoriales y la comunidad Nima-kai! (*Las traducciones de las historias elegidas están actualmente en proceso.)

La Favorita del Comité Editorial

 La elegida por Nima-Kai:

Para saber más sobre este proyecto de escritura >>

* Esta serie es presentado en asociación con: 

        ASEBEX

   

 

Mira también estas series de Crónicas Nikkei >>

identity en

Interned and enlisted: My family history

Tomo, my grandfather

My grandfather Tom (Tomo) was a joker, the self-confessed black sheep of the family. He liked to “stir the pot,” and his deep belly laugh would erupt whenever he sensed some kind of family controversy.

Just for fun, he left my grandmother waiting at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Sydney on their wedding day “FOR A LONG TIME” (she said) for him to arrive. She wanted to strangle him. He just laughed.

I called him Pop. He was strong-willed, bullish, hard-working but also very charismatic and well-liked. He seemed to have inherited his confidence from his Australian mother, …

lea más

identity en

In Conversation with Japanese-Australian artist Elysha Rei

Brisbane-based artist Elysha Rei’s bold paintings and intricate paper cuttings draw upon her Japanese heritage. Her grandmother Akiko was raised in Osaka until her father died when she was 12, as well as Tokyo and Manchuria. She was working as a typist just after the war when she met Glen an Australian soldier stationed in Iwakuni as part of the British Commonwealth Occupation Forces. The two fell in love and married in 1948. They had their first daughter in Japan – Elysha’s aunt, Patricia. Glen wished to leave the army and move to Australia with his new family, but this …

lea más

identity en

Life with Grandpa Toyoji & Grandma Kii Imai - Part 2

Read Part 1 >>

Grandmother Kii Imai (1873-1964) displayed her humbleness, respect for all forms of life, her debt of gratitude for everything, and her meekness. She was not as well educated formally as grandfather, but yet understood the nature of man and lived a life of gratitude. She greeted everyone with a deep bow, always with a smiling face. Unlike grandpa, she was the one who tilled the soil and took care of the back yard garden and grew vegetables for the family. She even taught me to sharpen the hoe using a flat file. She would put present …

lea más

identity en

Life with Grandpa Toyoji & Grandma Kii Imai - Part 1

PartGrandpa Toyoji (1869-1953--from Niigata, Japan) was unquestionably a unique person, exercising complete freedom and free will. His mannerisms and actions that he displayed, his character that he portrayed, makes me think he was one that no one can ever duplicate. He would be so stern at times, and yet on the other hand he could be very compassionate and caring. Grandfather was never a physical person, in that he was never seen in the back yard garden, nor working with tools, nor involved in any food preparation – he was not a manually oriented individual.

He was indeed a scholar; …

lea más

identity en

Yoru no kangaegoto | Night Thoughts

Jyā mata raishū ne!” 

“See you later!”

The Zoom call ends, and I finally head to bed.

Another long day has passed for the both of us. Meetings, deadlines, teaching. Otsukare sama

As I lie on my bed, staring into the dark abyss above, I reflect on how the day went, and the things I need to prepare for tomorrow.

How did we get here? By here, I mean co-founding Japanese for Nikkei and trying to advocate the importance of creating Nikkei spaces for language learners to thrive. For so long, I’ve been trying to run in …

lea más

Etiquetas

Australia Brisbane business canada culture family food Hawaii heritage Identity identity Imai Shoten internment Issei Japan Japanese for Nikkei Japanese language language mixed New Zealand religion Samurai Santa Fe Thailand traditions