Crônicas Nikkeis #10—Gerações Nikkeis: Conectando Famílias e Comunidades

O prazo para o envio de artigos ao Gerações Nikkeis foi encerrado em 30 de setembro. Agradecemos a todos que nos enviaram suas histórias!

Leia as histórias Gerações Nikkeis e ajude-nos a selecionar a favorita da comunidade Nima-kai. >>

O último dia para votar é 5 de NOVEMBRO.

Bem-vindo(a) à 10ª edição das Crônicas Nikkeis! Gerações Nikkeis: Conectando Famílias e Comunidades abrange as relações intergeracionais nas comunidades nikkeis em todo o mundo, tendo como foco especial as emergentes gerações mais jovens de nikkeis e o tipo de conexão que eles têm (ou não têm) com as suas raízes e as gerações mais velhas. No decorrer deste processo, esperamos obter uma visão mais aprofundada sobre a evolução das comunidades nikkeis ao redor do mundo.

Como são as relações entre as gerações na sua comunidade? O que mudou e o que continua o mesmo? De que forma os nikkeis mais jovens se envolvem com a sua comunidade? Como será o futuro da sua comunidade nikkei? Que tipos de legados você quer deixar para a sua comunidade? Aceitamos histórias pessoais, memórias, entrevistas/perguntas e respostas, ensaios, trabalhos de pesquisa e críticas. 

O prazo para o envio de textos vai de 1º de maio às 22h00 (horário de Brasília) de 30 de setembro de 2021.

Para maiores informações: 5dn.org/geracoes.

* Patrocinador de la comunidad:

        ASEBEX

   

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Passing on the Joy of Being Nikkei

I love obon. Standing under strings of chochin, their warm light dotting indigo summer skies like fireflies always feels like coming home. They transform a liminal space — a street or a parking lot — into a destination. Hot dogs and hamburgers coexist with ikebana and enka without question. For just a few hours, all of me makes sense. Of all the Nikkei traditions I grew up with, this was the one I most wanted to share with my child.

The 2020 pandemic had other plans.

Covid precautions quickly made clear that my child’s first obon would …

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Hardship and happiness: A New Zealand war bride’s life — Hiroko Kadowaki, 1929-2021

June Baldwin and her son Leon reflect on their mother and grandmother, Hiroko Kadowaki, who migrated to New Zealand in 1956 after marrying a New Zealand soldier she’d met in Hiroshima.

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JUNE (Nisei):

My mother, Hiroko, grew up on the small island of Daikonshima in the middle of a lake in Matsue City, Shimane prefecture, on the north-west coast of Japan. She was the third of four children. Her parents farmed their land. Mum often talked about their fruit orchard and soy beans, and how they made their own soy sauce and silk.

Mum dreamed …

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Geta, giri and going to Japan

My mother, Naomi Boese (née Taguchi), grew up in Tsuyama, Okayama-ken, Japan. Her mother was a housewife and her father was a postal official. Mum was the youngest of four children; the eldest was a girl, and two boys followed. Mum completed high school but her family couldn’t afford to send her to college, so she joined the staff at the US military base in Iwakuni.

She met my father, Selwyn Boese, sometime between 1955-57, when he was on discharge from the New Zealand Army after serving in the Korean War. My father found work as the assistant manager of …

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Japanese Kiwi

I descend from a long line of samurai families. I am the fifth of six children of my parents, Taeko Yoshioka and Noel Braid.

My parents met during the Japanese Occupation when Dad was on R&R there during his tour of duty in the Korean War. At 25 years old, he was a gunner in the 16th Field Regiment and my mother, 19, worked in a small, family noodle restaurant. My mother had a privileged upbringing as a child. My grandfather was an engineering officer in the Japanese Imperial Navy and my grandmother the daughter of a local doctor, both …

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Across Oceans

My parents met in Osaka when Mum was in her final year of school and Dad was a university student. Mum was an occasional backup singer on TV and graduated with a degree in nihongo (Japanese), while Dad worked as a sales representative for a kimono dress and fabric company.

They married in their 20s and enjoyed their life together for nearly a decade before I was born in 1987. With a baby on the way, Dad secured a job at a major Japanese real estate firm. He became a quintessential Japanese salaryman, leaving home before sunrise and returning late …

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abomb Australia bi-culture citizenship culture family hibakusha Hiroko Kadowaki hiroshima identity Iwakuni Japan Japanese Australian Korean War language New Zealand NikkeiGenerations obon Sydney traditions War Brides