Asociación Peruano Japonesa

The Japanese Peruvian Association (Asociación Peruano Japonesa, APJ) is a nonprofit organization that brings together and represents Japanese citizens who live in Peru and their descendants, as well as their institutions.

Updated May 2009

identity en es

Children of Dekasegi, Bilingual and Educated in Japan: The New Generation of Nikkei - Part 2

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How difficult was it to return to your lives in Peru?  Was it a shock, or did you both get used to quickly?

JBK: It was a big shock for me because I didn’t speak Spanish.  The first months, the first year, I didn’t have a way to communicate with people, including, for example, with my aunts; I always had a dictionary in my hand.  In addition to this, I would leave my house for a walk and I had to be careful and avoid being robbed, [and I] also had to be careful with the ...

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identity en es

Children of Dekasegi, Bilingual and Educated in Japan: The New Generation of Nikkei - Part 1

José Iraha Flores is twenty-three years old and studies communications in the University of Lima.  José Bravo Kohatsu is twenty-six and works in the Japanese consulate.  Both are children of dekasegi1 who were born in Peru but raised and educated in Japan where they learned Japanese.  Why did they return to Peru?  Do they miss Japan?  We wil explore these and other questions with them.

You went to Japan as young children and were educated there.  Afterwards you returned to Peru.  Why did you decide to make your lives here?

José Bravo Kohatus: I went to Japan when I ...

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community en es

It’s good to say “I’m Nikkei” because I am part of something - Part 3

Part 2 >> 

The Nikkei in Peru 

Kaori is impressed by the way the Nikkei community in Peru has preserved its identity. “What I really find admirable is that there is a place (Japanese-Peruvian Cultural Center) that seeks to maintain the Nikkei identity in some fashion; there’s no reason to analyze something which is always present: What it means to be Nikkei. Even offering a class on taiko is important enough. It’s like a down payment of sorts; if afterward you want to deepen your identity or your [knowledge] of history, it is a separate thing,” she affirms.

The ...

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identity en es

It’s good to say “I’m Nikkei” because I am part of something - Part 2

Part 1 >> 

Nikkei Identity 

Kaori was raised by her grandmother in a Japanese environment. “Our relationship within our Japanese home was one of constant silence; it took just a simple stare of disapproval to know that I did something wrong. My grandmother did not have to say anything for me to run away. This kind of Japanese behavior is a sign of environment rather than verbal rules,” she recalled.

Just like any typical Japanese home, you are taught by example, not with words. Kaori knew how she was supposed to behave, what was considered correct and proper by observing her ...

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identity en es

It’s good to say “I’m Nikkei” because I am part of something - Part 1

Two years ago a photograph changed Kaori Flores Yonekura’s life, a Venezuelan filmmaker whose grandparents were Japanese. It was a photo of Mr. Takeuchi, who at the time of the photograph was president of the Nikkei Association of Venezuela.

What was it about the photograph that changed Kaori? It showed some Japanese dressed in rural garb and eating arepas (bread made of corn flour) on a hillside. Kaori discovered that the people in the photograph were in Ocumare del Tuy, a town located some forty minutes from Caracas, and that the photograph dated to World War II.

Unlike what ...

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