Nima-kai

Are you a Nima*?

Nima are members of the Discover Nikkei online community called Nima-kai. Join our community and share your stories about the Nikkei experience. Click an icon on the map to connect with Nima around the world!

*The term “Nima” comes from combining Nikkei and nakama (Japanese for “colleagues”, or “fellows”, or “circle”).

Nima of the Month

susany (TUCSON, Arizona, United States)

Susan (Araki) Yamamura (susany) was born in Seattle, WA. When she was almost two years old, she was imprisoned with her family at Camp Harmony in Puyallup, WA, and Minidoka in Idaho during World War II. (You can download a PDF of her memories of that time: Camp 1942–1945. After retiring from her career as a computer programmer, Yamamura became a clay and watercolor artist as well as a fiction and nonfiction author. She recently began contributing stories to Discover Nikkei, and was the first to submit to Itadakimasu 2! Another Taste of Nikkei Culture.

[EN] A long comment that I made about long-dead family friend and principled Heart Mountain draft resister Minoru Tamesa on Discover Nikkei’s Facebook page triggered events that allowed me to write a three-part article on Min. I was amazed and delighted to find that Discover Nikkei is for communicating and learning about what it is to be Nikkei, with young and old Nikkei around the world. I am thrilled and very honored to become a part of this new and ever-growing Discover Nikkei international experience.

Read Susan’s articles >>

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Itadakimasu 2! Another Taste of Nikkei Culture

Submissions accepted until September 30.

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A project of the Japanese American National Museum

Major support by The Nippon Foundation