Kizuna: Historias Nikkeis del terremoto y tsunami de Japón

En japonés, “kizuna” significa fuertes lazos emocionales.

Estas series comparten las reacciones y perspectivas de los Nikkeis tanto en forma individual y/o comunal en el Gran Terremoto de Tohoku Kanto ocurrido el 11 de marzo de 2011 y el tsunami como también otros impactos- esfuerzos de colaboración o cómo afectó lo sucedido y sus sentimientos hacia el Japón.

Si quieres compartir tus experiencias, ver la página de instrucciones para enviar un artículo. Recibimos artículos en inglés, japonés, español y/o portugués. Estamos buscando diferentes historias alrededor del mundo.

Creemos que estas historias brindan consuelo a las víctimas en Japón y en el mundo, y esto resulta ser una cápsula de tiempo de reacciones y perspectivas de nuestra comunidad Nima-kai en el futuro.

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Hay diferentes organizaciones y fundaciones en el mundo que colaboran con Japón. Nos puedes seguir enTwitter @discovernikkei para los diferentes eventos y acciones Nikkei o chequear en la sección Eventos. En caso de colocar un evento de beneficencia favor agregar la etiqueta “JPquake2011” para que aparezca en los eventos relacionados con el terremoto en Japón.

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The Japan Earthquake and Tsunami

On March 11, 2011 still another catastrophe (not close to home in America but 5,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean) defined our lives. On a world-wide stage, Japan reacted to the force of nature and the devastation left in its wake. We who are Japanese by ancestry can understand (and be proud) of the courageous spirit of our relatives, friends and counter-parts in Japan. The human emotions of losing loved ones, homes, and businesses have no ethnic differentiation. But the surge of nature not once by the earthquake but by the intended finishing blow of the Tsunami still could ...

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Noodles: Standing With Japan

Gwen Muranaka’s weekly cartoon “Noodles” appears in The Japan Times, and occasionally in The Rafu Shimpo. The cartoons feature a Japanese American woman and her dog, presenting a Nikkei view of life in Japan. In this cartoon, she expresses solidarity for those suffering in Japan.

*This comic was originally published in The Japan Times on March 27, 2011.

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The Great Tohoku Disaster - Part 5

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This is a recreation of my personal experiences from the e-mails that I sent to friends in Canada and Japan, TV news reports in Canada, the U.S., and Japan, and from what my wife Akiko told me.

Wednesday, March 16

Hi Norm,

My name is Marnie and I was reading your article re: returning to Sendai that you wrote for Discover Nikkei.

I am particularly interested in story about Kurosu Senji. Many years ago I lived in Sendai as a singer and later as an English Teacher from Australia and became very close with Cross, his ...

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Operation Tomodachi

My name is Jay Horinouchi, and I’m a Japanese American artist currently living in Tokyo, Japan. I was born in Berkeley, raised in Silicon Valley, attended college in Pasadena and spent most of my professional career in Los Angeles, so I am very proud to call myself a native Californian as well.

Most Californians have some sort of love/hate relationship with earthquakes and the San Andreas Fault line. We pride ourselves on the fact that we are earthquake survivors and laugh at out-of-state folk when they cower at the slightest of jolts. But we also live in constant ...

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The Great Tohoku Disaster - Part 4

Read Part 3 >>

This is a recreation of my personal experiences from the e-mails that I sent to friends in Canada and Japan, TV news reports in Canada, the U.S., and Japan, and from what my wife Akiko told me.

Continuation of Tomo’s email from March 15:

Back to Sendai

Life here: …shortage everything. But we have so much more than tens of thousands of others. We took turns standing in line at the local food store for two hours. Petrol for the car—none. Kerosene—I basically hounded a guy to sell me about 6 liters to ...

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