Edna Horiuchi

Edna Horiuchi é professora da terceira série. Ela gosta de viajar e está tentando aprender japonês. Seu filho, Kenzo, trabalha agora no ramo da engenharia estrutural em São Francisco.

Atualizado em setembro de 2019

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Crônicas Nikkeis 8 — Heróis Nikkeis: Pioneiros, Modelos e Inspirações

Mine Okubo

The artist Mine Okubo is most famous for her book, Citizen 13660, a graphic memoir of the Japanese American concentration camps. She became my hero while I was a student at University of California (UC), Riverside in 1979. As a young woman in my twenties, I felt inspired by Mine’s accomplishments as part of the “greatest generation” that survived World War II. She did it on her own terms and without apology. She persevered as a female artist and in life itself. The difficulties she experienced made her stronger. She retained her Nikkei identity and never forgot the Japanese ...

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Crônicas Nikkeis #7 — Raízes Nikkeis: Mergulhando no Nosso Patrimônio Cultural

Meeting the Kumamoto Relatives

My first trip to Japan was in the summer of 2016. I was very nervous about meeting my recently-discovered Minami relatives, on my dad's mother's side. What  if  I didn't like them or if they didn't like us? I brought a whole suitcase of gifts or omiyage, carefully selected from Trader Joe's.

I was visiting my son, Kenzo, who was doing a semester of study abroad during his junior year at U.C. Berkeley. The last time we had traveled together had been when he was in high school, not happy to travel with mom ...

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Crônicas Nikkeis #7 — Raízes Nikkeis: Mergulhando no Nosso Patrimônio Cultural

Visiting the Former Family Temple

I had not expected to ever touch the temple entrance gate from the 1939 photo of my great-grandfather and his family. But here I was in Yamaguchi, Japan, reverently stroking and leaning against the weathered wood pillars and admiring the “Saikoji” sign. I was visiting my son, Kenzo, who did a study abroad semester during his junior year.

This journey began nearly forty years ago, when I was a young woman in my twenties. I was intrigued by an old black and white photo of my great-grandfather, Nobuyuki Oda and his family. They were posing near the family temple, Saikoji ...

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Crônicas Nikkeis #6 — Itadakimasu 2! Um Novo Gostinho da Cultura Nikkei

Restaurant Memory

My favorite restaurant in Little Tokyo is called Suehiro’s. It is a small Japanese restaurant on First Street between San Pedro and Alameda. It used to resemble a little mom and pop restaurant, but was recently remodeled to keep up with the rapidly gentrifying neighborhood. It is now more elegant and even has a wine bar, but it still serves the same comfortable, delicious food.

I like the chicken sukiyaki with its hearty broth and steaming noodles. I always search for the chewy shiitake mushroom hidden among the vegetables. The food is very simple: crunchy shrimp tempura, salty fish ...

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