Vicky K. Murakami-Tsuda

Vicky K. Murakami-Tsuda es la Gerente de Producción de Comunicaciones del Museo Nacional Japonés Americano. Le encanta trabajar en el proyecto Descubra a los Nikkei, porque le ofrece la oportunidad de conocer tantas historias nuevas e interesantes y conectarse con gente de todo el mundo que comparta intereses similares.

Vicky es una yonsei “autoproclamada” de California del Sur que proviene de una gran familia extendida. Hace mucho tiempo (cuando tenía más tiempo libre y energía), Vicky era también una artista que exploraba la cultura e historia japonesa-estadounidense a través de su arte. Actualmente, cuando Vicky no está trabajando, pasa la mayor parte del tiempo comiendo, jugando en Facebook o a los bolos, yendo a Disneylandia y leyendo.

Última actualización en marzo de 2016

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Reflexiones de un yonsei...

on Where the Trees Take Me

I'm a city girl...actually, more of a suburbanite. I need certain comforts around me—clean toilets, a shower, comfortable and warm place to sleep, etc. My pale skin proves that I don’t spend a lot of time outdoors. Yet, this year seems to be drawing me out of my normal habits, enticing me with new opportunities to get out in the sun.

In March, I joined my fellow Discover Nikkei co-workers for a hanami to see the sakura (Japanese cherry blossom) trees in bloom at Lake Balboa in Van Nuys, CA. Sakura trees usually blossom around April ...

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Reflexiones de un yonsei...

on How I Was Transported by Redress

My first car was a Toyota Tercel—frosted mint (a pale whitish-green color), two doors, and fairly bare-boned. It didn’t have power windows or doors, but it was all mine. Practical and functional, I had it for ten years before I traded it in for a Toyota Matrix. I rarely had any problems with it...dependable, it took me where I needed to go.

My parents purchased it for me using part of my father’s reparations money*. The reason why they purchased it was primarily practical—so my parents didn’t have to drop me off and pick ...

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on Connections

2007 was a year of change, revelations, and connections. I began the year writing the first in this column series about new beginnings and opportunities. My husband and I settled into our new home, we vacationed in New England for the first time (and ate a LOT of lobster!), and I started a family website to keep in touch with relatives throughout the year. At work, I was involved in many exciting projects that reinforced for me why after over twelve years, I still find fulfillment and exhilaration in working for a non-profit.

That’s not to say that all ...

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Oshogatsu Traditions in the United States

In the Western world, New Year’s Eve is a big day for parties to celebrate the end of a year and the fresh start of a new one. In Japan, the beginning of the New Year, or Oshogatsu, is when friends and family gather together for what is considered to be the most important holiday of the year. It is celebrated throughout the country and by Nikkei around the world with symbolic food, decorations, activities, and other traditions to wish for an auspicious year. In the United States, it is also a holiday whose celebration has melded Japanese and ...

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on returning to my JA bowling roots

Today, basketball and golf are the sports of choice in Japanese American communities, at least it seems to be in Southern California. However, back in the 1950s, ‘60s, and ‘70s, JA bowling leagues were all the rage. In it’s heyday, you almost had to be on a waiting list to join a team. Leagues were often scheduled back-to-back on the same night.

In 2000, the Japanese American National Museum had an exhibition called More Than a Game: Sport in the Japanese American Community. Included in the exhibition was a section about Japanese American bowlers like Dusty Mizunoue and Judy ...

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