Vicky K. Murakami-Tsuda

Vicky K. Murakami-Tsuda es la Gerente de Producción de Comunicaciones del Museo Nacional Japonés Americano. Le encanta trabajar en el proyecto Descubra a los Nikkei, porque le ofrece la oportunidad de conocer tantas historias nuevas e interesantes y conectarse con gente de todo el mundo que comparta intereses similares.

Vicky es una yonsei “autoproclamada” de California del Sur que proviene de una gran familia extendida. Hace mucho tiempo (cuando tenía más tiempo libre y energía), Vicky era también una artista que exploraba la cultura e historia japonesa-estadounidense a través de su arte. Actualmente, cuando Vicky no está trabajando, pasa la mayor parte del tiempo comiendo, jugando en Facebook o a los bolos, yendo a Disneylandia y leyendo.

Última actualización en marzo de 2016

identity en

Reflexiones de un yonsei...

on the Memories of an Elephant

Over the holidays, I was telling my niece about American Tapestry: 25 Stories from the Collection, the current exhibition at the Japanese American National Museum.

Two of my favorite artifacts from the exhibition are the 1939 Silvertone American short wave radio and a navy blue Schwinn bicycle with a lambskin seat cover. Both have similar heartwarming stories of friendship. Both were owned by Japanese American families prior to World War II and entrusted with friends, but never reclaimed after the war.

In the case of the radio, they were never able to locate the original owners. The father gave it ...

lea más

community en

Nima-kai Says…baka?

We’ve been “testing” out something this year at Discover Nikkei. It’s a Family Feud-type survey game. The first couple of times I ran around asking co-workers, volunteers, and friends to answer a couple of questions. The last time we did it, we decided to post the questions online. Between October 30 and November 19, 2010, there were 80 people who responded.

There were 12 questions, although not everyone answered each one. Yoko Nishimura (Discover Nikkei’s Project Coordinator) and I would excitedly check every day for new responses. As people began filling out the survey, we would discuss ...

lea más

identity en

Reflexiones de un yonsei...

on Real-Life Soundtracks

I’ve always thought that our lives would be so much more interesting if it came with a soundtrack. Music adds so much in setting up the mood and tone of movies, TV shows, and plays. It also can prepare us when something bad is about to happen. I’m not advocating that we should break out in song like in musicals, but imagine how cool (and helpful) it would be if some sweet romantic song swelled in chorus when you meet the love of your life…or if a song could warn you to stay away from a loser ...

lea más

sports en

Reflexiones de un yonsei...

on the Olympics

The Vancouver Olympics have come and gone. Every two years, our global attention and hearts are captured by athletes who compete for their nations.

I love watching the Olympics. It’s not just about who ends up on the podium and medal counts. It’s the spirit of the Olympics—the fanfare, the personal stories of the athletes, and the opportunities to learn about different countries and cultures.

Although I can often be cynical and sarcastic, at heart, I am an optimist and a perfectionist who is easily amused and entertained, loves happy endings, and especially cheering on underdogs and ...

lea más

identity en

Reflexiones de un yonsei...

on Embracing Traditions

The holidays are here! This year, at a time when we usually think about customs passed along through generations, I’ve been finding myself contemplating changing traditions. It’s hard to let go of what’s been ingrained as tradition year after year, especially when you enjoy it so much. Over the past few months though, I’ve been noticing an embracing of different cultures as part of our celebrations, a shift to a more multicultural holiday season.

Growing up, the holidays meant food and family. Every Thanksgiving was spent with the Omoto side of the family. It’s always ...

lea más