Andrea Lita Rademan

Andrea Rademan is the Vice President of the International Food Wine and Travel Writers Association. Her writing is published worldwide and she works on radio and as a judge at international culinary festivals. She covers a wide range of topics, all of which relate to her main interest — world cultures. She is endlessly fascinated by Japan, a tiny country that is, at one and the same time, the world’s most ancient and most modern society.

Updated September 2007

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Japanese Heritage in Vancouver, B.C.

Japantown, J-town, Little Tokyo, Nihonmachi, or Little Japan. Call them what you will, most of these enclaves sprang up in North America during the Meiji period (1868-1912). These were neighborhoods with small businesses, Japanese language schools, Buddhist and Christian churches, and even Japanese hospitals. In Vancouver, the neighborhood, which lay north of Chinatown, was attacked in September 1907 by the Asiatic Exclusion League. They rioted in Chinatown before moving on to the Japanese area. During World War II, the area lost its Japanese identity area, and only the Vancouver Buddhist Church, the Vancouver Japanese Language School and Japanese Hall remain ...

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Hollywood's A-List Finds a Home at Hamasaku

When Toshi Kihara left his home in Kyushyu, Japan, he was young and determined and hungry for success. He had studied cooking in Fukoka and moved on to Osaka, Japan’s “eating town” before setting his sights on Los Angeles. He brought only a suitcase, a dream, and a few words of English. But his is not the usual immigrant tale of hardship for Toshi also had a pocket full of money. The scion of a prominent family, when he left home he turned his share of the company assets over to his brother and went off to make his ...

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Donut Man Runs Rings Around the Competition

Some days it seems as if all of Los Angeles is lined up in front of the Donut Man’s modest shack in Glendora, an outlying suburb of this sprawling city. People crowd the two rickety wooden benches on the tiny front porch and snake around the building, sucking in the aromas of ripe fruit, sugary glaze and yeasty dough. Regulars include local college students, young mothers wheeling strollers, road-weary truck drivers, and the occasional celebrity (Roy Rogers and Elvis loved them—Jessie Jackson and Anthony Robbins still do). Fanatics drive for hours to get here, only to wait for ...

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