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Taken: Oregonians Arrested after Pearl Harbor

Oregon_Nikkei
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How were they selected?: Daiichi Takeoka

One of Portland's early Japanese immigrants, Daiichi Takeoka emigrated from Hiroshima in 1900 at the age of 18. From a farming family and with a mid-grammar school education, he worked on the Seattle, Portland & Spokane Railroad, in the timber industry, and at the Portland Hotel as a bellhop. Daiichi earned a law degree in 1912 from the University of Oregon and was recognized with a special trophy honoring his accomplishments, shown here. Japanese were not allowed to become citizens, though, and as a non-citizen he was not able to practice law. As a result, he worked for the Swift & Co. meat packers selling fertilizer to farmers.

Daiichi Takeoka was arrested on December 7, having been identified as a community leader. After the FBI left their home, his wife, educated as a teacher in Japan, looked in a closet underneath a stairway and noticed that all of the textbooks she used as a teacher at the Montavilla Japanese school were gone. She wondered why they would take the simple phonetic alphabet books.

Based on this original

Daiichi Takeoka in his office ca. 1910-1915, Portland, Oregon
uploaded by Oregon_Nikkei
Daiichi Takeoka in his office at 208 NW 3rd Avenue, Nihonmachi, Portland, Oregon, ca. 1910-1915. ONLC 202, gift of the Takeoka Family. Mr. Takeoka was a graduate of the University ... More »


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