Naomi Hirahara

Naomi Hirahara is the author of the Edgar Award-winning Mas Arai mystery series, which features a Kibei Nisei gardener and atomic-bomb survivor who solves crimes, Officer Ellie Rush series, and now the new Leilani Santiago mysteries. A former editor of The Rafu Shimpo, she has written a number of nonfiction books on the Japanese American experience and several 12-part serials for Discover Nikkei.

Updated October 2019

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Histórias sobre o Oshogatsu Nikkei de 2017 - Parte 1

No nosso boletim eletrônico de janeiro, o Discover Nikkei pediu o envio de histórias sobre o Oshogatsu. Convidamos os nossos leitores nikkeis de todo o mundo para nos mostrar, através de fotos e palavras, como eles deram as boas-vindas ao Ano Novo. Recebemos várias histórias escritas em inglês, japonês e português. Uma narrativa, escrita por Justin Inahara (inglês), foi tão longa que tivemos que publicá-la separadamente. O restante se encontraabaixo para a sua leitura. Divirta-se!

 

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Medidas Desesperadas da Mulher in-Chanto
Por Naomi Hirahara

Teve vezes que eu fiz ...

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Silk

Chapter Ten—Lost Samurai

Shin: To become a person who is trusted, and who can trust others.

—a principle of the Aizu people

As the Wakamatsu colonists began to leave Gold Hill, Matsunosuke “Mats” Sakurai began to have vivid dreams from his past in Aizu. It was almost as if the celestials were populating his world in his sleep to compensate for the ones who left in reality.

Gone were the Saitos, the young couple whose marriage seemed to be strained by the complaints of the competitive wife. No longer would Mats be entertained by the antics of the seven-year-old Nozomi, whose front teeth ...

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Silk

Chapter Nine—Pickles and the Promised Land

Ofuji Matsugoro wiped the sweat off of his forehead as he and his fellow carpenter, Kuninosuke “Kuni” Masumizu, took a break from their woodworking project inside the Veerkamp family’s barn on Gold Hill. Led by the family’s German patriarch, Francis, the Veerkamps were plentiful. By last count, Ofuji thought that there might be at least six children, all boys. One baby was just born; Ofuji himself was the older father of an infant daughter, Sakuko.

His fellow Japanese countryman, Kuni, was more than twenty years younger than him. Kuni, in fact, was about the same age as Francis ...

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Silk

Chapter Eight—Death of the Mulberry Tree

Keiko Shinshi hadn’t been feeling well for days. 

Her husband, Tatsutaro, thought it was because the last mulberry tree in the colony had died. Their silkworm room seemed like a gravesite, with the remains of shriveled up caterpillars lining the floor. A few cocoons were hanging from trees branches that his wife brought in. It was quite a barbaric process, with the cocoons being dropped into boiling vats of water so that the silk exteriors could be removed. In other words, the silkworms were cooked alive.

The production of silk had been Keiko’s consuming activity ever since they ...

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Chapter Seven—A Night in San Francisco

Among the Japan-born Wakamatsu colonists, Makoto and Kuni were the strongest English speakers. As a result, when the colony’s founder, John Henry Schnell, announced that he would be taking a trip to San Francisco to meet with some Japanese envoys, as well as do research into future agricultural exhibitions, he asked these two men to accompany him.

Makoto was elated. He had a visible scar in the middle of his face, a remnant from a failed battle to save their beloved castle in Japan, but one of his roommates, Kintaro, suffered from more psychic wounds. Kintaro had tried to ...

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