Lawrence Lan

Como parte del Programa de Prácticas de la Comunidad Nikkei (Nikkei Community Internship Program), Lawrence estará contribuyendo este verano con la página web de Discover Nikkei en su calidad de practicante de Discover Nikkei  en el Museo Nacional Japonés Americano (Japanese American National Museum o JANM); también estará trabajando con la Barra de Abogados Americano Japonesa (Japanese American Bar Association o JABA) para preservar el legado de juristas los nikkei prominentes en la comunidad.

Última actualización junio de 2012 

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El Proyecto del Legado JABA: Juristas Pioneros en la Comunidad Nikkei

Judge Vincent Okamoto: Fighting for Justice - Part 1

“I was in a position in Vietnam—to be in an arena where men with guns made the rules. And there really wasn’t anything called the rule of law. Those on the battlefield prevailed not because of better argument or because the facts were on their side. They prevailed because they had superior firepower.”

So says Judge Vincent Okamoto who sits on the Los Angeles County Superior Court bench as he begins to explain just how the most highly-decorated Japanese American Vietnam War veteran ended up a Superior Court judge.

In Okamoto’s chambers at the Inglewood Courthouse, fourteen ...

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El Proyecto del Legado JABA: Juristas Pioneros en la Comunidad Nikkei

Judge Ernest Hiroshige: Forging Community

Anyone who has ever met Judge Ernest Hiroshige, who sits on the Los Angeles County Superior Court bench, knows about his signature bow tie. There’s no huge story behind it—“I just like bow ties,” he said.

The influence of his bow tie reaches far beyond the walls of Department 54 at the Stanley Mosk Courthouse. In fact, the 32-year-old veteran of the bench tells a story about Clyde Kusatsu, a friend and actor who wore a bow tie—in honor of Hiroshige—to an audition for the role of a judge on the legal drama L.A. Law ...

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Kizuna’s Youth CAN Program: Investing in the Future of Little Tokyo

On a summer evening in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo, the yelling and antics of 27-year-old Craig Ishii and 24-year-old Kristin Fukushima fill the courtyard of the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center. For what it’s worth, their silliness has a purpose. They are tasked with breaking the icy awkwardness that has settled upon nearly 70 high school students from throughout Southern California. Fortunately, though, Craig and Kristin have done this before. By the end of the half-hour-long icebreaker session, names have been exchanged and some awkwardness dispelled.

The program is Youth CAN (short for Youth Community Action Network)—a ...

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“It’s not fair!”: Remembering Vincent Chin, Thirty Years Later

Thirty years ago from this past Saturday, on June 23, 1982, Vincent Chin died. Four nights earlier, on June 19th, Chin had been celebrating his bachelor party in a Detroit, Michigan strip club when he got tangled up with two white autoworkers who mistook Chin (who was Chinese American) for Japanese and blamed him for the rise of Japanese auto industries and the loss of their own jobs. The brief fight was broken up, and Chin and his friends left the club. It took twenty minutes for the two white men, Ronald Ebens and his stepson Michael Nitz, to find ...

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