Akemi Kikumura Yano

Dr. Akemi Kikumura-Yano é Diretora Geral y presidente do Museu Nacional Japonês Americano, e é “Chefe de Projeto” do Projeto do Legado Nikkei, responsável pelo website Discover Nikkei. Ela tem doutorado em antropologia da Universidade da Califórnia em Los Angeles, e é autora e teatróloga premiada. Seu livro mais conhecido é Through Harsh Winters: The Life of a Japanese Immigrant Woman (“Através de Invernos Rigorosos: A Vida de uma Imigrante Japonesa”).

Atualizado em fevereiro de 2008

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Mukashi Banashi - Part 4

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Today, there are approximately 100 Japanese American families living in the Fowler vicinity. Only three families continue to farm as their main economic source. Approximately 90 percent of these families belong to the Buddhist Church where church-related activities seem to be the recognized unifying force in the community. However, many residents have voiced their concerns over the community’s future since increased education, lack of job opportunities, changing cultural values, interracial marriages, and greater social acceptance by the white dominant society have prompted the Sansei and Yonsei (third and fourth generation) to leave the confines of rural …

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Mukashi Banashi - Part 3

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The children cradled the hopes of the Japanese community, for as American-born citizens, they would be entitled to the rights that the Issei were denied. But, as social and economic barriers continued to plague the community, the future of the second generation did not appear very promising. In 1913, the state had passed the first Alien Land Law, aimed particularly at the Japanese, forbidding them to own land and limiting leases to a period of three years. Some Issei, like the Abes, put the title of their farm in the name of the Osaki’s eldest son …

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Mukashi Banashi - Part 2

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When the women finally arrived in Fowler, they found a thriving Japanese community dominated by the interests of a predominantly male population. Like many towns in the county, Fowler’s Japanese community was situated on “the other side of the tracks” along with the Chinese who had settled there before them, and who, in the 1870s numbered five hundred, the largest immigrant group in Fresno County. Racial antagonism had compelled the Japanese and Chinese, as well as other ethnic minorities (German-Russians, Italians, and Armenians) to live in separate “colonies” that met the economic, social, and spiritual needs …

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Mukashi Banashi - Part 1

In the summer of 1981, I drove through the Tehachapi Pass from Los Angeles and descended onto the flat, dry floor of the San Joaquin Valley, one of the largest valleys in the world and once the bed of a vast inland sea, stretching approximately 250 miles long and 40 to 65 miles wide, extending from Sacramento in the north to Kern County on the south, and bounded by Mount Diablo Spur on the west and Sierra Nevadas on the east.1

I was headed for Fowler, a small agricultural town in the heart of Fresno County where I had …

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COPANI & KNT (2007)

Desafios atuais das comunidadades Nipo-Americanos

Atualmente, existe um grande número de desafios para as comunidades nipo-americanas nos Estados Unidos. O ponto principal destes desafios é o fato de que as comunidades nipo-americanas estão se tornando cada vez mais complexas, dispersas, e distintas. Não podemos mais categorizar as comunidades nipo-americanas por gerações – issei, nisei, sansei – as quais compartilham de crenças e experiências históricas. Velhas definições do que é um “nipo-americano” parecem agora completamente inadequadas já que em cada três nipo-americanos um é de etnia mista, e o mais recente movimento migratório após a Segunda Guerra Mundial – dos “Shin Issei” ou “Novos Isseis”, nascidos …

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