Tradiciones Nima-kai: Matsuri

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Cada año, las comunidades nikkei alrededor del mundo se reúnen para entretenidas actividades culturales y por comida. Estos matsuri (festivales) a menudo celebran ocasiones específicas, tales como el Tanabata y el Obon. Los principales festivales culturales son también organizados anualmente por organizaciones locales como son el Nisei Week Japanese Festival (Los Ángeles), el Northern California Cherry Blossom Festival, el Ginza Holiday Cultural Festival de Chicago, Festival do Japão (Brasil), Matsuri Aelu (Perú) y Powell Street Festival (Vancouver).

Descubra a los Nikkei recopiló fotografías para compartir nuestras tradiciones de matsuri de nuestra comunidad nikkei global. 


Te recomendamos usar la vista de presentación de diapositivas para ver las fotos que ha compartido nuestra comunidad Nima-kai.


*Presentado en conjunto con el Natsumatsuri Famiy Festival 2021 del Museo Nacional Japonés Americano, el 14 de agosto de 2021 y el Nisei Week Virtual Experience, el 14 de agosto.

Slides in this album 

Nisei Week 2018: Danzantes de Ondo del JANM

Ofrecido por: El Museo Nacional Japonés Americano (Los Ángeles, California, Estados Unidos)

El Nisei Week Festival (Festival de la Semana Nisei) culmina todos los años con entretenimiento en vivo y bailes ondo en las calles de Little Tokio. La comunidad está invitada a participar libremente. Muchas organizaciones …

JANM Ondo Dancers at 2018 Nisei Week Festival Ondo
Contributed by: JANM

Nisei Week 2018: Elvises Danzantes

Ofrecido por: El Museo Nacional Japonés Americano (Los Ángeles, California, Estados Unidos)

Fotógrafos voluntarios del JANM, también documentaron otros danzantes, como a este colorido grupo de Elvises bailarines en el Nisei Week Ondo del 2018. ¡Comparta sus fotos del Matsuri Nikkei! Todas las fotos deberán ser presentadas hasta …

2018 Nisei Week Ondo: Dancing Elvises
Contributed by: JANM

Nisei Week 2019: Awa Odori Dancers

Submitted by: Japanese American National Museum (Los Angeles, California, USA)  

The largest aspect of the annual Nisei Week Festival in Los Angeles is the grand parade down the streets of Little Tokyo with traditional Japanese dancing, floats, marching bands, celebrities, and various community groups. The Japanese American National Museum …

Awa Odori Dancers in the 2019 Nisei Week Parade
Contributed by: JANM

Nisei Week 2016: Nebuta Haneto Dancers

Submitted by: Japanese American National Museum (Los Angeles, California, USA) 

Nebuta haneto dancers at the 2016 Nisei Week Parade.

Photo by Daryl Kobayashi

Nebuta Haneto Dancers in the 2016 Nisei Week Parade
Contributed by: JANM

Nebuta float at the 75th Nisei Week Japanese Festival

Submitted by: Nisei Week Japanese Festival (Los Angeles, California, USA)

The Nebuta float making a stunning appearance at the 75th Nisei Week Japanese Festival.

Photo by Toyo Miyatake Studio

Nebuta float at the 75th Nisei Week Japanese Festival
Contributed by: editor

Taiko Performance at the 2019 Nisei Week Closing Ceremony

Submitted by: Nisei Week Japanese Festival (Los Angeles, California, USA)

A lively taiko performance at the 2019 Nisei Week Closing Ceremony & Ondo.

Photo by Toyo Miyatake Studio.

Taiko Performance at the 2019 Nisei Week Closing Ceremony
Contributed by: editor

Bando Hidesomi Dance Group in the Nisei Week Grand Parade

Submitted by: Nisei Week Japanese Festival (Los Angeles, California, USA) 

Bando Hidesomi leading her dance group in the Nisei Week Grand Parade.

Photo by Toyo Miyatake Studio.

Bando Hidesomi Dance Group in the Nisei Week Grand Parade
Contributed by: editor

Tamlyn Tomita leading group of children at Nisei Week Ondo

Submitted by: Nisei Week Japanese Festival (Los Angeles, California, USA)

Nisei Week Board Member and 1984 Nisei Week Queen Tamlyn Tomita leading a group of children during the Nisei Week Closing Ceremony & Ondo.

Photo by Toyo Miyatake Studio.

Tamlyn Tomita leading group of children at Nisei Week Ondo
Contributed by: editor

Exciting Time

Submitted by: Mary Sunada (Cerritos, California, USA) 

Three single ladies in our 20’s enjoying and participating in the opening ceremony of the Nisei Week Japanese Festival in Los Angeles, California during the late 1970s. My sister Marian, myself, and my high school classmate, Kiku, performed three Bon Odori …

Exciting Time
Contributed by: jsunada

Food Traditions

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Taketo Yamauchi, medical student from Japan, tries out traditional Japanese American obon food, tamales. Matsuri on this side of the Pacific include non-traditional foods that are tradition here. Taketo is now Dr. Yamauchi in Saitama, Japan.

Food Traditions
Contributed by: editor

Myles Hamada

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Myles is an avid dancer and can be found at all the obon festivals and other opportunities to do traditional and non-traditional “obon odori.” Myles always dresses for the part.

Myles Hamada
Contributed by: editor

The Rinban

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Rinban Noriaki Ito of the Higashi Honganji joins in on obon dancing each year. I think it’s important for temple leadership to participate in events like this, but to also enjoy themselves with temple congregation and members of the community.

The Rinban
Contributed by: editor

Community

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

The obon festivals bring together different parts of the local community to dance, have fun, share food, and to connect. Activities like this are an important part of our local community, but also play an important role in teaching those outside of …

Community
Contributed by: editor

Rassera, Rassera!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

The Haneto dancers lead the nebuta float down LA’s First Street. The Nebuta Festival in Aomori, Japan features giant paper lantern floats. However, the Nebuta Festival is never complete without Haneto dancers. Haneto dance is probably one of the easiest to …

Rassera, Rassera!
Contributed by: editor

Nebuta!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

A Nebuta of Takeda Shingen (1521-1573), famous daimyo of the Kai Province. The Nebuta Festival in Aomri, Japan traces its roots to the Heian period (794-1185) in which large paper lantern floats of famous figures in history are created. This was …

Nebuta!
Contributed by: editor

Dancing down 2nd Street

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

One of the many dance groups representing different schools dance down 2nd Street in Los Angeles. These moments in the Nisei Week Parade are memorable because of the different attires worn by the dancers.

Dancing down 2nd Street
Contributed by: editor

Whushi!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

The traditional Chinese Lion Dance performed as part of the 2009 Nisei Week parade. The original Chinatown in Los Angeles is a neighbor to Little Tokyo and their participation represents the close-knit nature of the local community.

Whushi!
Contributed by: editor

Awa odori!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

A form of dance from Tokushima, Japan, “Awa” is the old feudal name for the Tokushima Prefecture. The Awa odori can trace its roots back to the Kamakura period (1185-1333). The Awa Odori Festival is the largest matsuri in Japan and …

Awa odori!
Contributed by: editor

Generations!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Two different generations do Awa odori. The passing of traditions from one generation to another is an important part of any community and any cultural tradition.

Generations!
Contributed by: editor

Kodomo Nebuta

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Nebuta makers from Aomori, Japan helped locals make slightly smaller versions of the traditional nebuta. This was the first locally-made nebuta. Not quite as large as ones made in Aomori, but the size was intentionally restricted to make navigation easier in …

Kodomo Nebuta
Contributed by: editor

Bando Mitsuhiro Kai

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

The dance group led by the late Madame Mitsuhiro Bando (1928-2016). This particular year, Mme. Bando was the official choreographer for the Nisei Week Parade. Another example of how local dance groups dress-up in traditional garb to perform for the public.

Bando Mitsuhiro Kai
Contributed by: editor

Awa odori!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Local Awa odori dancers in traditional garb. It’s always fun to do a static capture of their various movements.

Awa odori!
Contributed by: editor

Okinawa Association of America (OAA)

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Led and organized by the Geinobu of the OAA, volunteers dance both traditional Okinawan and obon dances. Okinawa has its own unique history and traditions that are a mixture of cultures. It’s always a pleasure to see that on display like …

Okinawa Association of America (OAA)
Contributed by: editor

Together!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Passing on the tradition of celebrating matsuri and doing various dances is a critical component of keeping these traditions alive in the US. Although these little ones aren’t quite coordinated now, they will eventually be passing on this tradition to their …

Together!
Contributed by: editor

Yosakoi!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

The Yosakoisoran Hiragishi-Tenjin group from Sapporo, Japan. Fusing the traditional soranbushi folk song of Hokkaido with elements of Yosakoi dancing, this group was 2011 champions in Japan. Yosakoi is from Kochi Prefecture, but has spread throughout Japan. A subset of the …

Yosakoi!
Contributed by: editor

Yosakoi at night!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

The Yosakoisoran Hiragishi-Tenjin group from Sapporo, Japan does their unique brand of yosakoi at the foot of the Japanese Village Plaza yagura. Although a modernized version of yosakoi, keeping traditions like this alive and sharing with communities like ours is important.

Yosakoi at night!
Contributed by: editor

Tiny Dancer.

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

It’s never too early to get in your gear and start learning obon dances.

Tiny Dancer
Contributed by: editor

Yoshitsune

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Nebuta float of Minamoto Yoshitsune (1159-1189). Yoshitsune was considered one of the greatest warriors of the late Heian (794-1185) and early Kamakura periods (1192-1333), leading the Minamoto clan to victory over the Taira clan during the Gempei War.

Yoshitsune
Contributed by: editor

Sanjo Kanya

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Dancers from the Kanya Sanjo V Kabuki Dance Company. Madame Sanjo Kanya (1940-2019) was the official choreographer for the 2019 Nisei Week Parade, but sadly passed away four months before the actual parade. Her natori and students danced in her honor.

Sanjo Kanya
Contributed by: editor

Waving Goodbye to Mme. Sanjo Kanya

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Dancers from the Kanya Sanjo V Kabuki Dance Company as they dance down 2nd St. I viewed this as a final wave of good-bye to their sensei, Mme. Sanjo Kanya, who passed away four months before this event.

Waving Goodbye to Mme. Sanjo Kanya
Contributed by: editor

Traditions

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Many who dance at local obon or matsuri like to wear traditional garb. Capturing these various forms of dress is one of my traditions.

Traditions
Contributed by: editor

Awa odori

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

Leading the local Awa odori group down the parade route. Each dance group participating in the Nisei Week parade has an identifying banner or something to identify themselves. The introduction of the Awa Odori Tokushima Ren always has a more traditional …

Awa odori
Contributed by: editor

Just havin’ fun!

Submitted by: Richard Watanabe (Arcadia, Califronia, USA)

The local Awa odori group just out there having fun!

Just havin’ fun!
Contributed by: editor

Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival – Yamaga Toro Matsuri, 1998

Submitted by: Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County and Etsuko Honigsberg, Denver, CO

Photo 1 or 4: Coleen & Etsuko


Traveling to Japan to meet maternal relatives and to visit their village was a dream come true. The dream continued, watching the famous and spectacular Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival with 1000 …

Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival – Yamaga Toro Matsuri, 1998 - Etsuko and Coleen
Contributed by: editor

Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival – Yamaga Toro Matsuri, 1998

Submitted by: Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County and Etsuko Honigsberg, Denver, CO

Photo 2 or 4: Shaved ice

Traveling to Japan to meet maternal relatives and to visit their village was a dream come true. The dream continued, watching the famous and spectacular Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival with …

Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival – Yamaga Toro Matsuri, 1998 - Shaved Ice
Contributed by: editor

Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival – Yamaga Toro Matsuri, 1998

Submitted by: Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County and Etsuko Honigsberg, Denver, CO

Photo 3 or 4: Bon odori


Traveling to Japan to meet maternal relatives and to visit their village was a dream come true. The dream continued, watching the famous and spectacular Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival with …

Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival – Yamaga Toro Matsuri, 1998 - bon odori
Contributed by: editor

Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival – Yamaga Toro Matsuri, 1998

Submitted by: Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County and Etsuko Honigsberg, Denver, CO

Photo 4 or 4:  Matching yukatas

Traveling to Japan to meet maternal relatives and to visit their village was a dream come true. The dream continued, watching the famous and spectacular Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival with 1000 …

Yamaga Lantern Dance Festival – Yamaga Toro Matsuri, 1998 - matching yukata
Contributed by: editor

Ella's 1st Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2003

Submitted by: Ella Tamny and Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County

Photo 1 of 2: Ella's 1st Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2003

Even though Ella wasn't even walking yet, she felt the beat & spirit of the Obon Odori music and wanted to join the dancers.  Having just moved up …

Ella's 1st Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2003
Contributed by: editor

Ella's 1st Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2003

Submitted by: Ella Tamny and Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County

Photo 2 of 2: Ella with a big smile

Even though Ella wasn't even walking yet, she felt the beat & spirit of the Obon Odori music and wanted to join the dancers.  Having just moved up to the …

Ella's 1st Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2003 - Big smile!
Contributed by: editor

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004

Submitted by: Ella Tamny and Coleen Uchida-Tamny; Los Angeles County

Photo 1 or 5: Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004


Celebrating our culture and honoring our ancestors means so much to my family.  Seeing Ella dancing dances that my parents and their parents, etc. performed with such …

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004 - with big uchiwa
Contributed by: editor

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004

Submitted by: Ella Tamny and Coleen Uchida-Tamny; Los Angeles County

Photo 2 or 5: Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004


Celebrating our culture and honoring our ancestors means so much to my family.  Seeing Ella dancing dances that my parents and their parents, etc. performed with such …

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004
Contributed by: editor

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004

Submitted by: Ella Tamny and Coleen Uchida-Tamny; Los Angeles County

Photo 3 or 5: Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004


Celebrating our culture and honoring our ancestors means so much to my family.  Seeing Ella dancing dances that my parents and their parents, etc. performed with such …

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004
Contributed by: editor

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004

Submitted by: Ella Tamny and Coleen Uchida-Tamny; Los Angeles County

Photo 4 or 5: Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004


Celebrating our culture and honoring our ancestors means so much to my family.  Seeing Ella dancing dances that my parents and their parents, etc. performed with such …

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004
Contributed by: editor

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004

Submitted by: Ella Tamny and Coleen Uchida-Tamny; Los Angeles County

Photo 5 or 5: Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004


Celebrating our culture and honoring our ancestors means so much to my family.  Seeing Ella dancing dances that my parents and their parents, etc. performed with such …

Ella's 2nd Obon, San Francisco Japantown 2004 - with two uchiwas
Contributed by: editor

West LA Buddhist Temple Obon, 1999

Submitted by: Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County; and Kassy Duran, Utah

Photo 1 of 3: My niece


Growing up in Burbank, my family often made trips to Little Tokyo for a Sunday dinner at Far East. However, we usually celebrated Obon in West LA since my parents grew …

West LA Buddhist Temple Obon, 1999 - my niece
Contributed by: editor

West LA Buddhist Temple Obon, 1999

Submitted by: Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County; and Kassy Duran, Utah

Photo 2 of 3: wearing Yukata


Growing up in Burbank, my family often made trips to Little Tokyo for a Sunday dinner at Far East. However, we usually celebrated Obon in West LA since my parents grew …

West LA Buddhist Temple Obon, 1999 - wearing the yukata
Contributed by: editor

West LA Buddhist Temple Obon, 1999

Submitted by: Coleen Uchida-Tamny, Los Angeles County; and Kassy Duran, Utah

Photo 3 of 3: wearing yukata

Growing up in Burbank, my family often made trips to Little Tokyo for a Sunday dinner at Far East. However, we usually celebrated Obon in West LA since my parents grew …

West LA Buddhist Temple Obon, 1999 - Yukata & uchiwa
Contributed by: editor

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community history

editor — Última actualización Ago 23 2021 2:12 p.m.


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