Tuney-Tosheia P. McDaniels

Tuney-Tosheia P. McDaniels is a Chemistry English Instructor and Mercuro-Chemist in Japan. She observes the different effects of Mercury Sulfide. Her goal is to compare different people's perspectives of Mercury Sulfide, as well as different approaches to water sustainability.

Updated January 2022

identity en

How Going Backward Helped Me Move Forward

After being born and raised in the Black American community, years ago I had the opportunity to confirm my genetics through testing. I found out that I had Bukharan-Jewish and Japanese ancestry. I wanted to know about my ancestry ever since I was a child. However, in spite of America’s claims of embracing Diversity, there is an implicit tendency for Americans to put others in “boxes” and define them. I often heard the saying, “act like how you look like.” In the best case scenario, people will present “boxes” to you and tell you to choose the &l…

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Radiation and Rejection: Stigmatized in Japan and America

RADIATION AND THE ORIGIN OF HIBAKUSHA Radiation from the atomic bombs, black radioactive coloring from the black rain, and contamination from the dead bodies impacted the water supply BEFORE other victims experienced a thirst that became unquenchable. At this point, the victims who were clinging to life were so thirsty and disoriented, that all they could do was beg for water. Instead, they received a toxic contaminated mixture that should've no longer been called water. Perhaps in Hiroshima, bomb victims were exposed to a chemical reaction in their bodies that created Hydrogen gas and Ur…

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Kizuna 2020: Nikkei Kindness and Solidarity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

How UNICEF Information Helps Us Observe Nikkei Children Living Through a Pandemic and Economic Crisis

While I was observing and communicating with Japanese UNICEF Advocates on the street, some questions came to my mind: —Do the current pandemic and economic challenges affect the Nikkei communities in different countries the same way? How do the Nikkei communities in different countries perceive economic challenges, racism, prejudice, and even vaccinations? —For example, do Japanese Peruvians, Japanese Columbians, or Japanese Mexicans face more challenges than Japanese Americans, Japanese Canadians, Japanese Brazilians, or the Japanese in Europe? Or all groups treated the same no…

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Nikkei and Praying for Good Fortune and Success: How an Ancient Story Teaches resilience for Economic Uncertainty and Opportunity

As is customary in Japan and throughout the Japanese diaspora, many Nikkei Entrepreneurs pray for good fortune in business, success in life, and divine protection. From an Economic Anthropological perspective, praying allows entrepreneurs and business professionals to strengthen themselves from the worries surrounding economic instability, and even tune out the negativity they constantly hear on the news. While the traditional custom of Hatsumode (初詣), or the first shrine or temple visit of the new year, is to pray at the altar for Protection and Prosperity, a special festival—known as …

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community en

Kizuna 2020: Nikkei Kindness and Solidarity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

A Different Perspective: A Nikkeijin's Questions on Humanity's Responses to Economic Uncertainty

Is ignorance really bliss? What does it mean when people say, “I can’t wait for things to go back to normal”? What is defined as “normal”? Is “going back to normal” achievable after over 2.6 million deaths worldwide due to the Coronavirus—with over 530,000 Coronavirus-related deaths in the US alone? Also, what does it mean to be Economically stable at this point in time? In this article, I want to reflect from an Economic Anthropological perspective. This means I intend to focus on the issues of humanity neither based on rational decision-makin…

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