Stephanie Hinnershitz

Stephanie Hinnershitz is a historian at the Instutite for the Study of War and Democracy. She received her PhD from the University of Maryland in 2013 and has held various teaching positions before coming to The National WWII Museum. She has published three books and multiple articles on topics related to Asian American history and the Home Front during World War II.

Updated August 2021

 

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Mealtime in the Mess Halls

World War II shaped the culinary experiences of Japanese Americans in incarceration camps.

The incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II left its mark on the lives of those imprisoned in many ways, including the inability to escape the abnormally large number of hot dogs served at the camps. In 1943, a farewell party for a group of Japanese Americans leaving the Rohwer prison camp in Arkansas included baked weenies. A Fourth of July celebration at the Manzanar camp in California featured all-American foods in celebration of the nation’s founding, but one incarceree proclaimed, “By next week we …

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The “No-Yes” Men of the 1800th Engineering Battalion

The Japanese Americans who served in Company B of the 1800th should be remembered for their courage and dedication. 

The United States Postal Service commemorated the Nisei (or second-generation Japanese Americans) who served with valor during World War II by issuing the “Go for Broke: Japanese American Soldiers of WWII” stamp in June of 2021. “Go for Broke” was the motto of the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team, but the stamp also recognizes more than 30,000 Japanese American members of the US Army during the war. The storied 100th Infantry Battalion and 442nd (the most decorated unit of …

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