Kizuna 2020: Bondade e solidariedade nikkeis durante a pandemia da COVID-19

Em japonês, kizuna significa fortes laços emocionais. Em 2011, convidamos nossa comunidade nikkei global a contribuir para uma série especial sobre como as comunidades nikkeis reagiram e apoiaram o Japão após o terremoto e tsunami de Tohoku. Agora, gostaríamos de reunir histórias sobre como as famílias e comunidades nikkeis estão sendo impactadas, respondendo e se ajustando a essa crise mundial.

Se você deseja participar, consulte nossas diretrizes de envio. Receberemos envios em inglês, japonês, espanhol e/ou português e estamos buscando diversas histórias do mundo todo. Esperamos que essas histórias ajudem a nos conectar, criando uma cápsula do tempo de respostas e perspectivas de nossa comunidade Nima-kai global para o futuro.

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Embora muitos eventos em todo o mundo tenham sido cancelados devido à pandemia da COVID-19, percebemos que muitos novos eventos apenas online estão sendo organizados. Como são online, qualquer pessoa pode participar de qualquer lugar do mundo. Se a sua organização Nikkei está planejando um evento virtual, poste-o na Seção de Eventos do Descubra Nikkei! Também compartilharemos os eventos via Twitter @discovernikkei. Felizmente, isso ajudará a nos conectar de novas maneiras, mesmo quando estamos todos isolados em nossas casas.

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Nikkei Ramen-ya: Fresh-made Noodles and Living Wages in the Heart of the Comox Valley

When Greg Masuda and his wife Erin opened Courtenay’s first ramen shop in the fall of 2016, it was welcomed with open arms by the residents of this small British Columbia town nestled in the heart of the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island.

Nikkei Ramen-ya, located in a former jewelry shop, serves their own handmade noodles, made daily. Frequent experimentation, and specials like ebi ramen, made with wild sidestripe shrimp and local pea shoots, have ensured that the menu stays varied, and made the shop a hit with customers. A visit to their online ordering page reveals ten kinds ...

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Taking Flight After The Tumult

Little Tokyo and yearning for meaning and hope in the power of place.

A bird taking flight.

Little Tokyo is a small neighborhood of artists and activists, of commerce and spirituality, of parades and protests, densely layered by its long history and its proximity to the seats of power.

And so, in early June, Nihonmachi, wounded by a week of turbulence and tumult that has shaken an entire nation, took to the task of rebuilding and reforming a community. Summoning up, once again, those reserves of resiliency that have served the Japanese American community for so many generations.

Individuals, each ...

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Pilates Keeps Centenarian Healthy During Quarantine

TORONTO — On Nisei Masako Okawara‘s birthday, she looked out the window to see her two granddaughters and their families in the parking lot of her North Scarborough condo next to a sign reading, “Happy 100th Birthday!”

The rest of the day was filled with phone calls, flower deliveries, and a zoom video conference call with friends and family singing Happy Birthday, while she blew out the candle on an ice cream treat. Her five grandchildren made virtual flowers, since Okawara loves flowers, as one of the original members of the Toronto Ikenobo Ikebana Society.

It was not the way ...

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George Freeth, the Village of Maikura, and the 1918-1920 Pandemic

In December 1908, at the age of 25, the “father of surfing” George Freeth saved the lives of nine Japanese American and two Russian American fishermen off Venice beach when a violent Pacific storm lashed the coast. For his heroic actions, Freeth was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for bravery.

In April 1919, at the age of 35, the Hawaiian-born Freeth—noted for his physical fitness and still in his prime—died after a long battle with the flu virus spreading across the globe. He was the first person to surf the Huntington Beach pier at its re-dedication in 1914 ...

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food en

Food for thought — and sheltering at home

Anyone who knows me knows that I love to eat. I’m a foodie. I love restaurants (I’m opinionated about them, too). And, I love to cook. I post photos of my food on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, and even use the hashtags “#twEATs” and “#foodporn.”

I like all food from around the globe, from burgers and pizza to Middle Eastern, Italian, Swedish (thank you, Ikea!), Ethiopian, Mexican, Argentinian, South Asian, Vietnamese, Korean, Filipino and all flavors of Chinese including American Chinese. I’ve even eaten candied ants and cooked crickets. My gastronomic motto is “if someone somewhere on ...

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