Reflexões de um Yonsei...

Vicky Murakami-Tsuda é Gerente de Comunicações do Museu Nacional Japonês Americano. Ela é uma “auto-denominada” yonsei do Sul da Califórnia que vem de uma grande família estendida, que adora trabalhar no JANM (especialmente no Descubra Nikkei), curtir boa culinária, passar o tempo com a família, visitar o Facebook, ler, e numa época que ela tinha mais tempo e energia ainda era uma artista que explorava a cultura e a história nipo-americanas através dos seus trabalhos artísticos. Esta coluna inclui diversas reflexões sobre a sua vida e o mundo ao seu redor.

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on Daruma, Dorama, and Hope

Daruma are popular Japanese symbols of perseverance. Often used as good luck charms to fulfill a special wish, it’s customary to paint in the right eye when the wish is made, then paint the other eye when the wish is fulfilled.

It’s a traditional folk craft representing the 5th century Buddhist monk Bodhidharma who meditated so long that he lost the use of his arms and legs. Daruma dolls are often weighted on the bottom so that if tipped, they automatically find their balance and right themselves up again no matter how many times you push them down ...

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on What the Universe is Telling Me

“Seek out the significance of your problem at this time. Try to understand.” —fortune from a recent cookie 

The universe is trying to tell me something. Lately, I’ve been getting these “signs” that are telling me that I need to take a step back and look at the bigger picture. After a crazy and hectic summer, chock full of things both in my professional and personal life, I’ve been noticing these little clues with more frequency. They offer a path away from feelings of being overwhelmed. A lifeline sent to me through a fortune cookie.

At work, there ...

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on Where the Trees Take Me

I'm a city girl...actually, more of a suburbanite. I need certain comforts around me—clean toilets, a shower, comfortable and warm place to sleep, etc. My pale skin proves that I don’t spend a lot of time outdoors. Yet, this year seems to be drawing me out of my normal habits, enticing me with new opportunities to get out in the sun.

In March, I joined my fellow Discover Nikkei co-workers for a hanami to see the sakura (Japanese cherry blossom) trees in bloom at Lake Balboa in Van Nuys, CA. Sakura trees usually blossom around April ...

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on How I Was Transported by Redress

My first car was a Toyota Tercel—frosted mint (a pale whitish-green color), two doors, and fairly bare-boned. It didn’t have power windows or doors, but it was all mine. Practical and functional, I had it for ten years before I traded it in for a Toyota Matrix. I rarely had any problems with it...dependable, it took me where I needed to go.

My parents purchased it for me using part of my father’s reparations money*. The reason why they purchased it was primarily practical—so my parents didn’t have to drop me off and pick ...

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on Connections

2007 was a year of change, revelations, and connections. I began the year writing the first in this column series about new beginnings and opportunities. My husband and I settled into our new home, we vacationed in New England for the first time (and ate a LOT of lobster!), and I started a family website to keep in touch with relatives throughout the year. At work, I was involved in many exciting projects that reinforced for me why after over twelve years, I still find fulfillment and exhilaration in working for a non-profit.

That’s not to say that all ...

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