Junko Yoshida

Born and raised in Tokyo, Junko Yoshida studied law at Hosei University and moved to America. After graduating from California State University, Chico, with a degree from the Department of Communication Arts & Science, she started working at the Rafu Shimpo. As an editor, she has been reporting and writing about culture, art, and entertainment within the Nikkei society in Southern California, Japan-U.S. relations, as well as political news in Los Angeles, California. 

Updated April 2018

migration en ja

The 150th Anniversary of Wakamatsu Colony, the First Japanese American Settlement on the North American Frontier

Part 2: Okei's California Home

Read Part 1 >>

The story of the first Japanese woman to be buried in American soil emerges from history’s shadows.

The Wakamatsu Colony had collapsed and the pioneering dreams of the Japanese immigrants were shattered. The once-hopeful colonists dispersed, some deciding to return to Japan, while others chose to stay in California.

A neighboring farming family named Veerkamp purchased the site of the colony in Gold Hill, and hired some members of the former settlement to stay on for work.

The Veerkamps retained Matsunosuke Sakurai, a former Aizu samurai. Also staying on was a woman named Okei, who had ...

continue a ler

migration en ja

The 150th Anniversary of Wakamatsu Colony, the First Japanese American Settlement on the North American Frontier

Part 1: Pioneers Who Brought Their Hopes and Dreams

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the first Japanese American settlement on the North American frontier

If not for the relatively fresh flowers and metal cordon surrounding it, a small gravestone on a quiet hill in the California town of Gold Hill might go largely unnoticed. It is the final resting place of a girl, a member of first group of Japanese colonists to settle in North America – and the first Japanese woman to be buried in American soil.

Her name is Okei.

It was 150 years ago that the first Japanese settlers arrived on the American mainland, establishing ...

continue a ler

war ja

「YES」か「NO」 それぞれの決断:祖父の体験語り継ぐ孫たち ー 第2部

第1部を読む >>

プロジェクト通して伝えるツチダさん

日系史の研究活動をしているダイアナ・エミコ・ツチダさんは、強制収容所に入所していた日系人から話を聞き、彼らの経験や当時の生活などを伝えるプロジェクト「鉄柵」を進めている。第1部で紹介した日系人画家ロブ・サトウさんの祖父とは逆に、ツチダさんの祖父は戦時中、アメリカに忠誠を誓わず、忠誠登録の質問に「NO」と答えたひとり。正反対の祖父を持つ2人に、それぞれの思い、そして家族の物語を聞く第2回。今回はツチダさんの祖父タモツさんの話をお届けする。


「NO―」、忠誠誓わなかった祖父

ツチダさんは3年前にプロジェクト「鉄柵 ...

continue a ler

war ja

「YES」か「NO」 それぞれの決断:祖父の体験語り継ぐ孫たち ー 第1部

絵を通して伝えるロブ・サトウさん

第二次世界大戦中にヨーロッパ戦線に投入された日系人部隊「第442連隊」や、強制収容所での人々の様子を描いた日系人画家ロブ・サトウさん。サトウさんの祖父は戦時中、アメリカに忠誠を誓い、忠誠登録の質問に「YES」と答えた。一方、日系史の研究活動を行っているダイアナ・エミコ・ツチダさんの祖父は「NO」と答えたひとりだった。正反対の祖父を持つ2人に、それぞれの思い、そして家族の物語を聞いた。

 

「YES―」、米国に忠誠誓った祖父

サトウさんはロサンゼルスを拠点に活動するアーティストだ。サトウさんが描いた水彩画は ...

continue a ler

identity ja

第2回 日米をめぐる家族の物語:やっと会えた実母、そして別れ

第1回を読む >>

千葉県柏市に住む島村直子さんは、伯父で画家の故・島村洋二郎の息子で、3歳の時に養子として米国にわたったいとこのテリー・ウェーバーさん(鉄さん)を30年にわたり探し続けてきた。東京の乳児院や児童相談所、アメリカ大使館のほか、テリーさんの養父母が卒業した大学にも問い合わせるなどしたが、努力も虚しく手がかりは一向に見つけられなかった。万策尽き果てたある日、テリーさんがトーレンスに住んでいることが判明。昨年3月、遂に2人は対面を果たすことができた。そしてこの出会いは家族のさらなる物語の始まりでもあった。

それはテリーさんが実の母を探すところから始まった。テリーさんの実母・君子さんは、テリーさんが生後間もない頃、夫である洋二郎の元を去っていた。以来、テリーさんは君子さんの消息を探ったことはなかった。しかし ...

continue a ler