Sachiko Masuoka

Sachiko Masuoka was born in Hiroshima. She survived the atomic blast. In 1962, she came to the US through an arranged marriage with a Nisei Japanese American. She moved to Chicago, where he had settled after being released from the Topaz internment camp. They have two children.
 
She is a member of Soyokaze Chorus group and Chicago Hiroshima Kenjinkai.  She is know in Chicago for her Fukashi manju.  Each one is identical in size because she meticulously measures each an before  placing it in the center of a piece of dough and shaping it into a ball. She made 1000 for a New Years Party in 2009.

Updated June 2010

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Hiroshima Story - Part 3

This is a story told by Sachiko Masuoka about living through the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

>> Part 2

We went to the fist aid station many times, but the scene was so terrible that I could not watch. I just covered my eyes. There was not enough help and it was humid and hot everyday. The flies were all over the burn patients. They planted eggs in their wounds, which, in a few days, turned into maggots. Soon they were covered with maggots. There was nothing they themselves could do. I believe many of them died because of that.

Everybody ...

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Vozes de Chicago

Hiroshima Story - Part 2

This is a story told by Sachiko Masuoka about living through the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

>> Part 1

That night (the 7th), mother came home late in the evening and told us about the death of my younger sister, who was 14 years old. She was at the school grounds for the opening ceremony at the nearby junior high. The school was near the epicenter. After the bright lightning flash (pika), the surroundings became dark. While one wondered what to do, the flash came again. At that time, everyone was around, so it was a relief that she did not ...

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Vozes de Chicago

Hiroshima Story - Part 1

This is a story previously told by Sachiko Masuoka about living through the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

I would like to welcome all of you. Thank you for the introduction. My name is Sachiko Masuoka. I would like to speak to you as I remember my experience when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima 63 years ago.

At 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945, we were all lined up for the morning ceremony, as all Japanese schoolchildren do. At that moment, the bomb was dropped. When I heard the sound of the explosion, I looked up at ...

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