Greg Robinson

Greg Robinson, um nova-iorquino nativo, é professor de História na l'Université du Québec à Montréal, uma instituição de língua francesa em Montreal, no Canadá. Ele é autor dos livros By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans (Harvard University Press, 2001), A Tragedy of Democracy; Japanese Confinement in North America (Columbia University Press, 2009), After Camp: Portraits in Postwar Japanese Life and Politics (University of California Press, 2012) e Pacific Citizens: Larry and Guyo Tajiri and Japanese American Journalism in the World War II Era (University of Illinois Press, 2012), The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches (University Press of Colorado, 2016) e coeditor da antologia Miné Okubo: Following Her Own Road (University of Washington Press, 2008). Robinson também é co-editor de John Okada - The Life & Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy (University of Washington Press, 2018). Seu livro mais recente é uma antologia de suas colunas, The Unsung Great: Portraits of Extraordinary Japanese Americans (University of Washington Press, 2020). Ele pode ser contatado no e-mail robinson.greg@uqam.ca.

Atualizado em julho de 2021

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When Danger Flew East: The Career of Miki Morita

One of the most fascinating, and most poignant, stories of Nikkei performers in the “golden age” of Hollywood is that of Miki Morita (AKA Mike Morita). While he never achieved the stardom of Sessue Hayakawa, he appeared in some 50 films in 1930s Hollywood. He also distinguished himself by his campaign against hostile stereotyping. Information on Morita’s early life is sparse and unverified. He was born Mitsugi Morita in Nagano, Japan on September 1, 1888, the son of Shinzaburo Morita. In 1907 the 18-year-old “Mitsuki Morita” arrived in Seattle, with his destinat…

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The Ichioka Women - Part 2: Achievement and Conflict

Read Part 1 >> Toshia Mori was not the only performer from the Ichioka clan, nor the only family member to win renown. First, sister Mia was able to build her own film career outside Toshia’s shadow. Mizuye “Mia” Ichioka was born in Japan on Jan 28, 1916, and arrived in the United States as a small child. In the early 1930s, Mia studied at Los Angeles’s Poly High School, graduating in 1933.  Mia’s first film role (nilled as Media Ichioka) came when she appeared together with sister Toshiye in the silent film Streets of Shanghai (1927), play…

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The Ichioka Women - Part 1: The Story of Toshia Mori

In the 1930s, the women of the Ichioka family in Los Angeles excelled in multiple walks of life, including medicine and the performing arts. The brightest light among them was Toshia Mori, who became one of the first Japanese Americans to shine in Hollywood during the sound era. Sadly, the family’s relations degenerated into divisions and ultimately protracted legal conflict. The head of the family was the physician and surgeon Dr. Toshio Ichioka. Born Toshio Sato in Hiroshima, Japan on February 3, 1884, he attended medical school at Tokyo University. When his bankrupt family was una…

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Japanese Canadians: Race, Religion, and Confinement

The current exhibition at the Japanese American National Museum, entitled Sutra and Bible: Faith and the Japanese American World War II Incarceration, centers on the role of religion in the wartime Japanese American experience. It follows on the work of scholars such as Duncan Ryuken Williams, Anne Blankenship, and Beth Hessel, who have shed light on such topics as religious workers in camp and religious affiliation as a means of community formation. In fact, religion also played an important and largely unrecognized role in the mass official confinement of Japanese Canadians during Worl…

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The Kai family: A Transnational Nisei Story - Part 2

Read Part 1 >> An intriguing pendant to the life of Yoshio Kai is the story of his sister Miwa, six years his junior. Born in San Francisco in 1913, she moved to Japan with the Kai family, as mentioned. However, perhaps because of the damage done by the 1923 earthquake, Miya was desperate to leave her new Japanese home. Though she was only 11, she was able to secure her return from Japan to the United States, in the company of Mrs. Kyutaro Abiko (the wife of the editor of the Nichi Bei Shimbun). Once settled again in San Francisco, Miwa was placed in the care of Toro Kawasaki, then a …

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