Greg Robinson

Greg Robinson, um nova-iorquino nativo, é professor de História na l'Université du Québec à Montréal, uma instituição de língua francesa em Montreal, no Canadá. Ele é autor dos livros By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans (Harvard University Press, 2001), A Tragedy of Democracy; Japanese Confinement in North America (Columbia University Press, 2009), After Camp: Portraits in Postwar Japanese Life and Politics (University of California Press, 2012) e Pacific Citizens: Larry and Guyo Tajiri and Japanese American Journalism in the World War II Era (University of Illinois Press, 2012) e coeditor da antologia Miné Okubo: Following Her Own Road (University of Washington Press, 2008). Sua coluna histórica “The Great Unknown and the Unknown Great”, é um traço bem conhecido do jornal Nichi Bei Weekly. O último livro de Robinson foi The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches (University Press of Colorado, 2016).

Atualizado em junho de 2017

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Defendendo Nikkeis: Hugh Macbeth e o Encarceramento de Nipo-Americanos

Hugh Macbeth, Sr., um advogado negro de Los Angeles, está praticamente esquecido nos dias de hoje, mas ele merece ser homenageado como um espetacular defensor dos nipo-americanos durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial. Nascido em Charleston, na Carolina do Sul, em 1884, Hugh Ellwood Macbeth cursou a Fisk University e a Faculdade de Direito de Harvard, se formando em 1908. Depois de morar alguns anos em Baltimore, onde ele fundou o jornal The Baltimore Times, em 1913 ele se mudou para a Califórnia.

Nas décadas seguintes, Macbeth se tornou um personagem importante no meio jurídico e político ...

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Way Down in Egypt Land: Tamio Wakayama, Civil Rights Photographer - Part 2

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I cannot recall precisely when I first heard of Tamio Wakayama. Although I owned a copy of A Dream of Riches and had looked through his 1992 book Kikyō – Coming Home to Powell Street, I had only a rather vague sense of him until about 10 years ago, when I began hearing about a Japanese Canadian who had once been active in the civil rights movement. As a historian who had focused on connections between Blacks and Japanese Americans, I was definitely interested. I spoke about Tamio with Allyson Nakamoto, director of educational programs at the Japanese ...

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Way Down in Egypt Land: Tamio Wakayama, Civil Rights Photographer - Part 1

In the column I wrote some time ago on the Nisei photographer Yoichi Okamoto, who served as official photographer in the White House during the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson, I spoke about how his photographs go beyond political propaganda and shine as both art and history. This is, if anything, even more true in the case of Tamio Wakayama, another Nikkei whose camera captured the history of 1960s America. Tamio Wakayama was not only a witness, who documented the events surrounding him in inspired fashion, but by his very presence he was touched by them.

Tamio Wakayama had an ...

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Eugene Rostow’s Japanese American articles: A Reconsideration - Part 2

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Eugene Rostow’s twin articles appeared in late summer 1945. The overall thesis of both pieces was that the indefinite “internment” of West Coast Japanese Americans under prison conditions, and the severe property losses they had sustained, had been a grave injustice - “the worst blow our liberties have sustained in many years.”1 Worse, by upholding the government’s actions in the “Japanese American cases,” the Supreme Court had converted a “wartime folly” into permanent legal doctrine.2

Rostow asserted that in the Supreme Court cases, the government had not offered any proof of military necessity that ...

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Eugene Rostow’s Japanese American articles: A Reconsideration - Part 1

In the annals of civil rights, a special place should be reserved for Eugene Rostow. In 1945, even as Japanese Americans remained confined in camps by official order, Rostow, then a young law professor at Yale University, published a pair of articles that criticized their wartime treatment. In his first article, “The Japanese-American Cases - A Disaster,” published in the Yale Law Journal in mid-1945, Rostow presented a powerfully-reasoned critique of removal and incarceration as America’s “worst wartime mistake,” and refuted the official justifications offered. He followed this with an article in the popular magazine Harper’s in September 1945 ...

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