Tamiko Nimura

Tamiko Nimura é uma escritora sansei/pinay [filipina-americana]. Originalmente do norte da Califórnia, ela atualmente reside na costa noroeste dos Estados Unidos. Seus artigos já foram ou serão publicados no San Francisco ChronicleKartika ReviewThe Seattle Star, Seattlest.com, International Examiner  (Seattle) e no Rafu Shimpo. Além disso, ela escreve para o seu blog Kikugirl.net, e está trabalhando em um projeto literário sobre um manuscrito não publicado de seu pai, o qual descreve seu encarceramento no campo de internamento de Tule Lake [na Califórnia] durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial.

Atualizado em junho de 2012

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Persimmon and Frog: Reading a Kibei-Nisei Tacoma Artist's Journey

In 2014, I had visited Tacoma artist Fumiko Kimura in order to profile her for a retrospective exhibition at Tacoma Community College. Kimura’s story and artistic journey fascinated me. When I met her, she was a Kibei-Nisei artist in her 80s. Last year, she celebrated her 90th birthday. She is a Kibei who did not experience wartime incarceration, who began her professional life as a chemist before transitioning into artmaking, who pursued an artist’s life successfully in addition to marriage and motherhood, who combined Western and Japanese art making techniques freely, and who co-founded the Puget Sound Sumi ...

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Kizuna 2020: Bondade e solidariedade nikkeis durante a pandemia da COVID-19

Learning From the Issei Grandfather I Never Met

“What you are feeling is grief,” says the article from Harvard Business Review. And yes, living in COVID-19 in Washington State, March 2020 feels like a kind of grief, even though I have grieved before. But the waking up to a profoundly altered reality each day, each wave a fresh infusion of loss, or a looming reminder of losses to come—grief feels like an appropriate description.

Honestly, the way that I dealt with grief in the past was to avoid. I avoided through hyperactivity, through overachievement, anything to avoid feeling grief. Learning the skill of grieving has really taken ...

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‘Working With Communities And The People’: A Conversation With Yonsei Pastor Karen Yokota Love 

For a layperson, picturing a call into ministry might look like a voice from on high, literally calling someone to their service.

It wasn’t like that for Reverend Karen Yokota Love, who is a Yonsei pastor serving the Blaine Memorial United Methodist Church in Seattle, Washington. In 2019 she was appointed the church’s first woman senior pastor in its 116-year history.

“[Going into ministry for me] was also about doing justice work,” Reverend Karen says now. “If we think about with Martin Luther King [Jr], …He was a pastor, a minister, right? And that basically was all about ...

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Giving with Gratitude: The Nisei Student Relocation Commemorative Fund

“They were at a picnic in New Hampshire,” says Jean Hibino. Her Nisei parents were UC Berkeley students during World War II, and though they were imprisoned at Tanforan and then Topaz, their time in camp was brief. Thanks to the National Japanese American Student Relocation Council, which operated from 1942 to 1946, Hibino’s parents and close to 3600 other Nisei college students were able to leave camp in order to finish their college education, many in the Midwest and on the East Coast. Eventually the Hibinos found “other Japanese American expats” on the East Coast, as Hibino calls ...

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The Way of the Nisei Artist: A Tribute to My Uncle, Hiroshi Kashiwagi

In 1993, I was at long choir rehearsal in college. My friend Marcy was taking Asian American Literature that semester, and during one of the breaks I glanced over at what she was studying.

The book was thick with small print, and was the first of its kind that I’d ever seen: an anthology of Asian American literature, called The Big Aiiieeeee! At the top of one side of the page was a title: “Laughter and False Teeth.” At the top of the opposite page was a name that startled me: Hiroshi Kashiwagi.

“That’s my uncle!” I said ...

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