Vicky K. Murakami-Tsuda

Vicky K. Murakami-Tsuda é a Gerente de Comunicações do Museu Nacional Japonês Americano. Ela adora trabalhar no projeto Descubra Nikkei, porque ele lhe dá a chance de descobrir muitas histórias novas e interessantes, e de se conectar com pessoas de todo o mundo que compartilham interesses em comum.

Ela é uma “auto-denominada” Yonsei do Sul da Califórnia que vem de uma grande família estendida. Há muito tempo atrás (quando ela tinha mais tempo livre e energia), ela também era uma artista que explorava a cultura e história nipo-americanas através da sua arte. Agora, quando não está no trabalho ela passa a maior parte do tempo curtindo boa culinária, visitando o Facebook, jogando boliche, passeando pela Disneylândia e lendo.

Atualizado em março de 2016

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Reflexões de um Yonsei...

on Embracing Traditions

The holidays are here! This year, at a time when we usually think about customs passed along through generations, I’ve been finding myself contemplating changing traditions. It’s hard to let go of what’s been ingrained as tradition year after year, especially when you enjoy it so much. Over the past few months though, I’ve been noticing an embracing of different cultures as part of our celebrations, a shift to a more multicultural holiday season.

Growing up, the holidays meant food and family. Every Thanksgiving was spent with the Omoto side of the family. It’s always ...

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on Mixed Holidays

Growing up, every year on the evening of March 16th, I would always make sure to wear something green to sleep. This was a self-preservation measure. If I didn’t—the moment I woke up—I would be mercilessly pinched by my mother, gleefully observing the St. Patrick’s Day tradition.

I remember one year, my father, who is a gardener, came home from work wearing his usual work clothes. My mother was ready to pounce on him, but then he smiled broadly and pointed to the green leaf pinned to his shirt. My mother was disappointed, but we all ...

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Reflexões de um Yonsei...

on Memories of My First Visit to Hawai‘i

Valentine’s Day is tomorrow. Set aside for acknowledging the loves and relationships in our lives, it’s a day celebrated for exchanging obvious gifts like chocolates, flowers, or other so-called romantic gifts.

This Valentine’s Day though, I will be spending the day at the Japanese American National Museum with my husband celebrating the quiet strength and subtlety of everyday lives and love. Gokurosama: Contemporary Photographs of Nisei in Hawai‘i, featuring black and white photos by Brian Y. Sato, opens to the public with a special tour and public program. As with many of the Museum’s and ...

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Reflexões de um Yonsei...

on Emerging from Hibernation

I was awakened from a dream this morning by a phone call. In my dream I had deeply gouged my hand, but it wasn’t bleeding. I was calmly, yet urgently, getting gauze and tape from a medicine supply cabinet when I was jarred from slumber.

Sometimes, I occasionally have very involved and detailed dreams. These stress-induced dreams tend to have recurring plotlines and even similar settings. I haven’t had them in a while, but I’ve had dreams in which I’m being chased. I’m alone and running through backyards and crouching behind trees and bushes. Suddenly ...

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Reflexões de um Yonsei...

on Daruma, Dorama, and Hope

Daruma are popular Japanese symbols of perseverance. Often used as good luck charms to fulfill a special wish, it’s customary to paint in the right eye when the wish is made, then paint the other eye when the wish is fulfilled.

It’s a traditional folk craft representing the 5th century Buddhist monk Bodhidharma who meditated so long that he lost the use of his arms and legs. Daruma dolls are often weighted on the bottom so that if tipped, they automatically find their balance and right themselves up again no matter how many times you push them down ...

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