Akiko Kusunose

Akiko Kusunose was born in Fukuoka, Japan. She has been living in the United States since 1976. She retired as the Editor-in-chief of the North American Post in 1999.

Updated January 2019

community en ja

Masaru Tahara, Japanese Community Service of Seattle Former Co-Chairman - Part 2

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Long-time community caretaker

“It might be because I spent such a long time in microbiology research, but I am always quick to take notes,” Tahara says. When he joined the Tengu Club in 1963, he quickly volunteered to take over as secretary. Beginning with the 18th derby (1962-63), he has been recording the club’s activities ever since. But he is not just the chronicler of the Tengu Club’s history; he has also taken on the role of being the club’s voice in the community at large. One story he is proud of is what ...

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community en ja

Masaru Tahara, Japanese Community Service of Seattle Former Co-Chairman - Part 1

Masaru Tahara arrived in Seattle after World War II as a young man and sank roots into the Japanese American community, working actively with the Issei and Nisei, first- and second-generation residents. Later, he made a point to educate the third- and fourth-generation Japanese Americans about their forebearers, writing about their history and culture in English. Tahara worked passionately to bridge the gap between the English- and Japanese-speaking communities and is known well among those who like to fish. He is very proud of the 50-plus years he’s spent as part of the Tengu Club, a Japanese American fishing ...

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community en ja

Taking Root in Communities - Eighty-five Years of History at Rainier Ginsha

A haiku association in Seattle, Rainier Ginsha will begin its 85th year in 2019. Nineteen members of the association bring their haiku once a month, expressing seasonal scenes and feelings in a seventeen-syllable poem. “I’ve been making haiku for seventy years now, sometimes with joy and at other times with pain, but still with love” says one member Shoshi Takamura. Despite haiku being loved by many, Rainier Ginsha had to walk some rough roads to get to where they are now. Let us look back on its history, referring to the writing of Teruko Kumei, professor at Shirayuri University ...

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