Gil Asakawa

Gil Asakawa escreve sobre cultura pop e política a partir de uma perspectiva asiático-americana e nipo-americana em seu blog, www.nikkeiview.com. Ele e seu sócio também fundaram o www.visualizAsian.com, em que conduzem entrevistas ao vivo com notáveis ​​asiático-americanos das Ilhas do Pacífico. É o autor de Being Japanese American (Stone Bridge Press, 2004) e trabalhou na presidência do conselho editorial do Pacific Citizen por sete anos como membro do conselho nacional JACL.

Atualizado em novembro de 2009

politics en

Nikkei View

Memorial for Colo. Gov. Ralph Carr dedicated

Ralph Carr, the man who served as governor of Colorado at the start of World War II, had been largely forgotten for decades. But thanks to an effort by the Asian Pacific Bar Association (APABA) and a biography by journalist Adam Schrager, Carr’s making a comeback in Colorado, and his legacy is finally getting its due, with a fine biography, a stretch of Highway 285 named in his honor, and now, a memorial to Carr’s legacy at Kenosha Pass.

On December 12, representatives of Denver’s Japanese American community, APABA, and CDOT assembled at a scenic overlook just ...

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community en

Nikkei View

History in the Northwest

11:00 a.m.

Here I sit in my rental car, mere yards from the water. I’m waiting for the Bainbridge Island Ferry in Seattle—I missed the last one by just seconds and the next one leaves in an hour.

Bainbridge Island is the place captured poetically in the book and movie, “Snow Falling on Cedars” (which means, come to think of it, that it snows in Seattle, at least sometimes).

A generation of Japanese Americans settled there in the early part of the 20th century. And, those Japanese Americans and their families were rounded up and railroaded ...

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identity en

Nikkei View

Reiko Rizzuto’s “Hiroshima in the Morning” is a powerful memoir - Part 2

>> Part 1

I emailed Rizzuto, who’s now a teacher at Goddard College in Vermont, where she teaches in the MFA in Creative Writing program, to see if I could ask several questions about her and the book. Here are excerpts from her responses:

1. Are you going by Reiko now instead of Rahna? (I noticed that in some places she’s called “Reiko” where in the past she’d gone by “Rahna”)

The name change, though it suits me and I am happy with it, was kind of an accident. When I came back from Japan, I was in ...

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identity en

Nikkei View

Reiko Rizzuto’s “Hiroshima in the Morning” is a powerful memoir - Part 1

The media are reporting on how Muslim Americans are braced for attacks this weekend, because of the 9/11 anniversary. I know what that’s like, unfortunately, though not on the scale of violence and hatred Muslims are facing today.

It’s a sad commentary on the state of American “patriotism” that Japanese Americans still get nervous every December 7 because we grew up with racial slurs of “go home, Japs” and “Remember Pearl Harbor!”

Such are the deep emotional scars that form after a national trauma, and ethnicity and religion add layers of fear and complexity. It’s understandable ...

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culture en

Nikkei View

RIP Kyoko Kita – Denver’s Japanese community loses a cultural giant

Tonight Erin and I heard some sad and shocking news. Kyoko Kita, a sensei, or teacher, of almost any traditional Japanese art or cultural tradition, died this morning of a massive heart attack while driving her sister and cousin back to Denver International Airport for their return to Japan. When she felt chest pains, Kita Sensei pulled off I-70 and saved her guests’ lives before dying.

It’s a symbolically fitting, though incredibly sad, end to a rich and incredibly influential life.

Erin and I had just seen her a couple of months ago, at an event at the Consul ...

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