Civil Rights and Japanese American Incarceration

In this curriculum, students will: Learn and analyze the concept of civil rights; develop a basic understanding of the events leading up to and including the mass removal and incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II; become familiar with the diversity of Japanese American experiences; analyze the decision to incarcerate Japanese Americans; learn to think critically and make informed opinions; evaluate different opinions and generate alternative perspectives on an issue; learn tools to enhance awareness and communication; work effectively in small and large groups; and support and effectively express opinions.

Targeted Standards:
History-Social Science Framework for California Public Schools, Grade 11 - The relocation and internment of 110,000 Japanese Americans during the war on grounds of national security was a governmental decision that should be analyzed as a violation of their human rights.
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National Standards for United States History - Evaluate the internment of Japanese Americans during the war and assess the implication for civil liberties.
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Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements -
SOCIAL STUDIES: CIVICS
Benchmark 3 - Grade 10
1.0 The student understands and can explain the core values and principles of the U.S. democracy as set forth in foundational documents, including the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.
1.1 understand and interpret the major ideas of foundational documents
1.1.2 explain specific rights guaranteed by the Constitution and how these rights are related to responsibilities
1.2 examine key ideals of U.S. democracy
1.2.1 examine the origins and continuing influence of key ideals of the U.S. democracy such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and rule of law
1.2.2 analyze why democratic ideals demand that people work together to reduce the disparity between ideals and realities

2.0 The student analyzes the purposes and organization of governments and laws.
2.1 understand and explain the organization of the U.S. government
2.1.2 identify problems and solutions related to the distribution of power between the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government
2.2 understand the function and effect of law
2.2.1 explain how the Constitution is maintained as the supreme law of the land and how it is changed or amended
2.3.3 analyze and explain how citizens can influence governments, for example, voting, lobbying, protest, or revolution

4.0 The student understands the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the principles of democratic civic involvement.
4.1 understand individual rights and their accompanying responsibilities
4.1.1 explain how responsibility to the common good might conflict with the exercise of individual rights, for example, freedom of expression or private property rights
4.1.2 examine why democracy requires government to protect the rights of citizens and to promote the common good
4.2 identify and demonstrate rights of U.S. citizenship
4.2.1 engage in oral and written civic discourse to analyze pressing controversial issues and evaluate different solutions
4.3 explain how citizen participation influences public policy
4.3.1 analyze the influence of a diversity of public opinion on the development of public policy and decision-making

SOCIAL STUDIES: HISTORY
Benchmark 3 - Grade 10
1.0 The student examines and understands major ideas, eras, themes, developments, turning points, chronology, and cause-and-effect relationships in U.S., world, and Washington State history.
1.3 examine the influence of culture on U.S., world, and Washington State history
1.3.1. examine and discuss historical contributions to U.S. society of various individuals and groups from different cultural, racial, and linguistic backgrounds
2.0 The student applies the methods of social science investigation to investigate, compare and contrast interpretations of historical events
2.1 investigate and research
2.1.1 identify social issues and define problems to pose historical questions
2.1.2 investigate a topic using electronic technology, library resources, and human resources from the community
2.2 analyze historical information
2.2.1 organize and record information
2.2.2 distinguish fact from judgment and opinion; recognize stereotype; compare and contrast historical information
2.3 synthesize information and reflect on findings
2.3.1 evaluate information and develop a statement of the significance of the findings; defend own analysis
2.3.2 reason logically; compare and contrast differing perspectives; argue both for and against a position
3.0 The student understands the origin and impact of ideas and technological developments on history and social change
3.2 analyze how historical conditions shape ideas and how ideas change over time
3.2.1 compare the meaning of ideas in different places and cultures, for example, ideas about spirituality, progress, and governance

SOCIAL STUDIES: GEOGRAPHY
Benchmark 3 - Grade 10
2.0 The student understands complex physical and human characteristics of places and regions.
2.1.1 use observation, maps, and other tools to identify and compare the physical characteristics of places and regions such as wildlife, climate, natural hazards, and waterways
3.0 The student observes and analyzes the interaction between people, the environment, and culture.
3.1.1 analyze the different ways people use the environment, the consequences of use, and possible alternatives
3.2.1 explain how the physical environment impacts how and where people live and work
3.3.1 identify the many groups and subcultures that may exist within a large society and how they interact

Author(s):
Densho, originally developed by Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE)

授業案のタイトル 対象学年
Lesson 1: Setting the Context
Students discuss the definition of civil rights and consider the importance of civil rights in their lives. They also examine the U.S. Constitution as a document that describes the ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 1: Setting the Context - Activity 1-1: An Introduction to Civil Rights
In this activity, students are introduced to the definition of civil rights and are asked to come up with examples of civil rights. Then, students are presented with the Bill ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 2: The Immigration Years
Introduces students to the Japanese immigration experience in the United States. The lesson involves the experiences of Japanese immigrants in the early 20th century as depicted in comic strip form.
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 2: The Immigration Years - Activity 2-1: A Japanese Immigrant Experience
In this activity, students examine experiences of early Japanese immigration to the United States as depicted in three episodes of comic strips by Henry (Yoshitaka) Kiyama. Students will learn about ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 3: Prelude to Incarceration
This lesson introduces the precarious position Japanese Americans were thrust into following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Reactions from popular media and the Japanese American ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 3: Prelude to Incarceration - Activity 3-1: Perspectives Through Popular Media
In this activity, students examine some of the attitudes expressed in the U.S. media towards Japanese Americans prior to their removal from the West Coast. Students are first presented ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 3: Prelude to Incarceration - Activity 3-2: Japanese American Perspectives Through Congressional Testimonies
In this activity, students will examine the testimonies of two Japanese Americans at a congressional committee hearing in San Francisco, California, in order to understand how the Japanese American community ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years
This lesson provides students with information on events leading up to and including the mass removal of Japanese Americans from the West Coast of the United States. Students examine the ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years - Activity 4-1: U.S. Government Perspectives Through a Newsreel
This activity engages students in an analysis of a newsreel made by the U.S. War Relocation Authority (WRA) and the Motion Pictures Division of the Department of War. The ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years - Activity 4-2: Perspectives Through Photographs
This activity engages students in an analysis of photographs taken prior to and during the mass removal and incarceration of Japanese Americans from the West Coast.
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years - Activity 4-3: Perspectives of a Scholar in the Camps Through His Writings
In this activity, students examine the writings of Stanford University Professor Yamato Ichihashi, who was incarcerated during World War II. His writings are contained in the book, Morning Glory, Evening ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years - Activity 4-4: Perspectives of Incarcerated Japanese Americans Through Poetry and Art
This activity introduces students to perspectives on the Japanese American incarceration through poetry and art. Five groups of students will examine poetry, and five groups will examine art.
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years - Activity 4-5: Perspectives of a Caucasian Woman in Heart Mountain Incarceration Camp
In this activity, students examine the life of Estelle Ishigo through excerpts from the documentary Days of Waiting by Steven Okazaki. Ishigo was one of the few Caucasians incarcerated in ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years - Activity 4-6: Perspectives Through an Autobiography
Professor Daniel Okimoto, a professor of political science at Stanford University, was born at the Santa Anita Assembly Center and spent the first few years of his life in an ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years - Activity 4-7: Japanese Latin American Perspectives Through Photographs and a Newspaper Article
In this activity, students learn about the 2,264 members of the Japanese community in Latin America who were deported to and interned in the United States during World War ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 4: The Incarceration Years - Activity 4-8: Perspectives Through a Dramatic Reading
Distant Voices is a dramatic reading of the diary of Hiroaki Nishimura, written during his experience at the Tule Lake incarceration camp. To provide a more in-depth historical background, Danny ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 5: The Question of Loyalty
In this lesson, students examine perspectives of Japanese Americans who either served or refused to serve in the military during World War II.
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 5: The Question of Loyalty - Activity 5-1: Perspectives of Japanese American Soldiers Through Autobiographies and Letters
In this activity, students are introduced to Japanese American soldiers who fought in Europe. They were soldiers of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team.
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 5: The Question of Loyalty - Activity 5-2: Perspectives of the Military Intelligence Service Through an Autobiography
In this activity, students learn about the Japanese Americans who served in the U.S. Military Intelligence Service (MIS) during World War II. Their experiences were particularly unique because they ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 5: The Question of Loyalty - Activity 5-3: Perspectives of Resisters Through Editorials
In this activity, students examine the perspectives of Japanese Americans who refused to serve in the military until their rights as U.S. citizens were restored.
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 5: The Question of Loyalty - Activity 5-4: Perspectives of a No-No Boy Through an Excerpt From a Novel
Through a character in a novel, students examine the perspectives of Japanese Americans who answered no-no to questions #27 and #28 on the controversial questionnaire that presumably tested the loyalty ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 6: Legacies of Incarceration: Redress
In this lesson, students learn more about the Redress Movement as a legacy of the incarceration that affects all Americans today.
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 6: Legacies of Incarceration: Redress - Activity 6-1: Perspectives on Redress and Reparations
In this activity, students debate whether the U.S. government should provide redress to Japanese Americans who spent time in incarceration camps. A third of the class will argue for ...
9-12
undergraduate
Lesson 6: Legacies of Incarceration: Redress - Activity 6-2: Contemporary Perspectives on the Mass Removal and Incarceration of Japanese Americans
This web-based activity provides students with an opportunity to do research and to incorporate information presented earlier in the module. Students will design a memorial commemorating the Japanese American experience ...
9-12
undergraduate

Lessons in this unit cover the following:

対象学年:

9-12, undergraduate

言語:

English

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