Crónicas Nikkei #7 — Raíces Nikkei: Indagando en Nuestra Herencia Cultural

Las historias en la serie Crónicas Nikkei han explorado las diversas maneras en que los nikkei expresan su cultura única, ya sea a través de la comida, el idioma, la familia o la tradición. En esta oportunidad, estamos ahondando más a fondo, ¡hasta llegar a nuestras raíces!

Les pedimos historias desde mayo hasta septiembre de 2018. Todas las 35 historias (22 en inglés, 1 en japonés, 8 en español y 4 en portugués) que recibimos desde Argentina, Brasil, Canadá, Cuba, Japón, México, Perú y los Estados Unidos. 

En esta serie, le pedimos a nuestros Nima-kai votar por sus historias favoritas y a nuestro Comité Editorial elegir sus favoritas. En total, cuatro historias favoritas fueron elegidas.

Aquí estás las historias favoritas elegidas.

  Editorial Committee’s Selections:

  La elegida por Nima-Kai:

Para saber más sobre este proyecto de escritura >>


Mira también estas series de Crónicas Nikkei:

#1: ¡ITADAKIMASU! Sabores de la cultura nikkei 
#2: Nikkei+ ~ Historias de Lenguaje, Tradiciones, Generaciones y Raza Mixtos ~ 
#3: Nombres Nikkei: ¿Taro, John, Juan, João? 
#4: La Familia Nikkei: Memorias, Tradiciones, y Valoress 
#5: Nikkei-go: El idioma de la familia, la comunidad y la cultura  
#6: ¡Itadakimasu 2! Otros sabores de la cultura nikkei

culture en

Pictures and Poetry: Deepening the Connection to my Japanese Roots

Growing up Sansei in my part of California’s San Gabriel Valley meant you didn’t have to work very hard to stay connected to your Nikkei roots—they were all around you. Every family that lived on our South San Gabriel street was Japanese American. We shared Japanese food, holidays, and a mania for gift giving. Our most exotic neighbors were from Okinawa, which as a child I took to be a country separate from Japan. Our local Issei “fish man” would come by weekly his truck to sell the neighborhood moms sashimi-grade tuna and fresh tofu, and our ...

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Magic, the Nikkei Way

Since the age of ten I’ve been a magician. I spent many hours during my childhood wearing a top hat and cape, waving a wand and brandishing a deck of cards. I’ve long since abandoned those Victorian accoutrements but have continued to work sleight of hand amusements for audiences in hotel banquet halls, living rooms, and theaters.

As in other art forms, the world of magic looks to master practitioners of its past. The magic inventions of these past masters all carry the stamp of their individual styles—a sleight of hand sequence with cards by Dai Vernon ...

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identity en

Hometowns

I wanted to walk where my grandparents, Hikosaburo Okamura and Tsuru Uyeta, walked.

In the early 1900s, they left Japan and came to America. I did not speak Japanese. My grandparents did not speak English. I remembered no stories about their lives in Japan.

There is a Japanese song, Furusato by Angela Aki, which says:

“Home is always calling out my name.”

If I visited their Hometowns, would they call out my name?

The unprepared visitor

One month before my Japan trip, I did not know my ancestral villages. My grandparents came from Fukuoka, Japan. This is an area the ...

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identity en

Meeting the Kumamoto Relatives

My first trip to Japan was in the summer of 2016. I was very nervous about meeting my recently-discovered Minami relatives, on my dad's mother's side. What  if  I didn't like them or if they didn't like us? I brought a whole suitcase of gifts or omiyage, carefully selected from Trader Joe's.

I was visiting my son, Kenzo, who was doing a semester of study abroad during his junior year at U.C. Berkeley. The last time we had traveled together had been when he was in high school, not happy to travel with mom ...

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community en

From Lung to Ito

I am a third generation Chinese American, born on the island of Oahu during the great depression. My grandparents came from Canton, China and, at that time, the Hawaiian Islands were governed by the Royal Hawaiian Kingdom, King Kamehameha’s descendants. When I was born, Hawaii was still a territory of the United States Citizens in Hawaii had no voting rights until the Hawaiian Islands became a State on August 21, l959. By that time, I was twenty-seven years old.

Growing up in the Islands was very carefree for me. Kids mostly did not wear shoes, walked to school unescorted ...

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