Crónicas Nikkei #4 — La Familia Nikkei: Memorias, Tradiciones, y Valores

Los roles y las tradiciones de la familia nikkei son únicos porque han evolucionado a través de muchas generaciones, basados en varias experiencias sociales, políticas, y culturales del país del que ellos migraron.

Descubra a los Nikkei ha reunido historias de todo el mundo relacionadas con el tema de la familia nikkei, que incluyen historias que cuentan la manera cómo tu familia ha influido en la persona que eres y que nos permiten entender tus puntos de vista sobre lo que es la familia. Esta serie presenta estas historias.

Para esta serie, hemos pedido a nuestros Nima-kai que voten por sus historias favoritas y a nuestro comité editorial que escoja sus favoritas.

Aquí estás las historias favoritas elegidas.

  Las elegidas del Comité Editorial:

  La elegida por Nima-Kai:

Para saber más sobre este proyecto de escritura >>

Mira también estas series de Crónicas Nikkei:

#1: ¡ITADAKIMASU! Sabores de la cultura nikkei 
#2: Nikkei+ ~ Historias de Lenguaje, Tradiciones, Generaciones y Raza Mixtos ~
#3: Nombres Nikkei: ¿Taro, John, Juan, João? 
#5: Nikkei-go: El idioma de la familia, la comunidad y la cultura 
#6: ¡Itadakimasu 2! Otros sabores de la cultura nikkei
#7: Raíces Nikkei: Indagando en Nuestra Herencia Cultural

culture en

Discovering a Family Connection in JANM's Collection

Jack Yamasaki, my father’s uncle, is someone I only have the faintest memories of seeing on occasion and visiting during holidays. I always knew he was an artist though, because I’ve been surrounded by his artwork my entire life—drawings and paintings by “Uncle Jack” have always hung on the walls of my parents’ and grandmother’s homes. Looking back, his artwork was probably my earliest exposure to art as a child.

A few decades later, I find myself fortunate enough to have studied art and to have worked in museums. I’ve had the opportunity to see ...

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migration en

Sugi Kiriyama, A Typical Issei Woman

Issei are identified with similar characteristics that Nisei would concur: came to this country with no English skills, no money, dreams of success and possibly returning to Japan. They were hard-working, endured racism and physical abuse, lived through the Great Depression and the injustice of the World War II concentration camps, and bore hardships for the sake of their children, the Nisei, born here in the United States.

The Issei woman was all the above, plus being the smiling, doting grandmother to her Sansei grandchildren, never showed the pain and hardship she endured, even in her personal life. She was ...

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identity en

Taste of Okinawa

Crackle!

The sound of deep-frying on the stovetop fills the house as my mom prepares her authentic andagi, our family’s favorite snack. Andagi is basically an Okinawan donut: flour, sugar, and eggs. They’re deep-fried to a golden crisp and doughy on the inside with just the right amount of sweetness—not too much, not too little, just perfect.

My childhood is full of fond memories of my mom standing by the stove making andagi, or as my family called them, sata tempura. I knew even then as a child that it made her happy to see me and ...

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identity en

Grandfather’s Gift

There is something unique about being in the presence of one’s Nisei grandparents. Maybe it is their years of life experiences, simply their wisdom, and/or their understanding how you feel when no one else does; but, whatever it may be, they are more than just individuals who allow you to have all the sweets you can possibly consume. They are teachers of cultural values. As I close my eyes, it seems like it was only yesterday, at the age of four, that I learned my few first and foremost important traditional Japanese values through my grandfather, Kay Kei ...

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war en

Discovering My Father Was a No-No Boy

This is the story of a rank-and-file supporter of the Heart Mountain Fair Play Committee, one of the many never named who chipped in two hard-earned 1944 dollars to the defense fund for the young draft resisters.

His name was George Yoshisuke Abe, and yes, he was my father. Dad died in his sleep on April 1, his last laugh on all of us. He was 91.

In preparing for his service, I revisited a chronology he wrote some years ago, and was startled to discover something I’d completely overlooked: Dad was in fact a no-no boy.

This is ...

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