Greg Robinson

Greg Robinson, nativo de Nueva York, es profesor de historia en la Universidad de Quebec en Montreal , una institución franco-parlante  de Montreal, Canadá. Él es autor de los libros By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans (Editorial de la Universidad de Harvard, 2001), A Tragedy of Democracy; Japanese Confinement in North America (Editorial de la Universidad de Columbia, 2009), After Camp: Portraits in Postwar Japanese Life and Politics (Editorial de la Universidad de California, 2012), y Pacific Citizens: Larry and Guyo Tajiri and Japanese American Journalism in the World War II Era (Editorial de la Universidad de Illinois, 2012), The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches (Editorial de la Universidad de Colorado, 2016), y coeditor de la antología Miné Okubo: Following Her Own Road (Editorial de la Universidad de Washington, 2008). Robinson es además coeditor del volumen de John Okada - The Life & Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy (Editorial del Universidad de Washington, 2018). El último libro de Robinson es una antología de sus columnas, The Unsung Great: Portraits of Extraordinary Japanese Americans (Editorial del Universidad de Washington, 2020). Puede ser contactado al email robinson.greg@uqam.ca.

Última actualización en julio de 2021

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Tani Jôji: Chronicles of a Japanese Vagabond in America - Part 2

Read Part 1 >> Having reflected on the life and work of Hasegawa Kaitarō, I now wish to discuss the new French edition, translated by Gérald Peloux, of the Tani Jôji Chronicles. The volume starts with a prologue, a kind of poem whose verses evoke, in impressionistic images, the different places the author visited overseas, such as Shanghai; Australia; Chicago; Elizabethtown, Kentucky; Dalian and Sujiatun, Manchuria; Montreal; Valparaiso, Chile; and finally New York. For example, among the author’s impressions of the port of Cardiff, Wales were “Various toba...

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Tani Jôji: Chronicles of a Japanese Vagabond in America - Part 1

Whenever I visit Paris, I love to spend time going through bookstores, looking for interesting French books for my library. On my last trip, I went to the Librarie Le Phénix, my favorite bookstore for works on Asia and Asian Americans. While browsing the shelves, I came across a paperback with the delightful title Chroniques d’un trimardeur japonais en Amérique. [Chronicles of a Japanese Vagabond in America]. The author was listed as Tani Jôji. I had never heard of either the author or the work in question. I bought a copy of the book, and as I started reading the...

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Otto and Iris Yamaoka: Asian Actors in 1930s Hollywood - Part 2

Read Part 1 >> Iris Yamaoka actually started her film career before her older brother Otto. She was a less prolific performer than her elder brother, perhaps because as a Nisei woman she faced gender as well as racial stereotyping. Still, her film career was most interesting in its own right. Iris Yamaoka was born in Seattle in 1910—she was the second youngest and only daughter of the six Yamaoka siblings. She was still in her teens when she moved to Hollywood and had her first film roles, opposite the Japanese-born acting star Sojin Kamiyama. In 1929, at the dawn of the so...

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Otto and Iris Yamaoka: Asian Actors in 1930s Hollywood - Part 1

As readers of this column know, I have done a great deal of research in recent years on the panoply of Asian American performers who worked in Hollywood in the generation before World War II. Theirs was not a simple life. Hollywood studios made frequent use of white actors in yellowface to portray Asians (many of these portrayals now seem cringeworthy to a current-day audience). Even such roles as ethnic Asian performers were given to play, whether servants, menial laborers, or sensual exotics, often carried a heavy load of stereotyping and condescension. Worse, their parts were often small...

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Leo Amino: Building a Brighter Art Through Plastics - Part 2

Read Part 1 >> In 1946, on the initiative of the famed artist Josef Albers, Leo Amino was invited to teach a summer institute at Black Mountain College, the progressive arts school in North Carolina. There he mixed with such luminaries as Jacob Lawrence and Walter Gropius. He would teach another summer session there in 1950. In 1952, Amino joined the faculty at Cooper Union in New York City, where he taught sculpture for some 25 years. In the course of his teaching career, his students included Ruth Asawa, Carl Ludwig Brumme, Jack Whitten, Bacia Edelman, and Kenneth Noland. In addit...

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