Stuff contributed by Greg

Defending Nikkei: Hugh Macbeth and the Japanese American Internment

Greg Robinson

Hugh Macbeth, Sr., a Black attorney from Los Angeles, is largely forgotten today, but he deserves commemoration as an outstanding defender of Japanese Americans during World War II. Born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1884, Hugh Ellwood Macbeth attended Fisk University and Harvard Law School, graduating in 1908. After living ...

Speaking Up! Democracy, Justice, Dignity

Speaking Out in Seattle: The JANM Conference

Greg Robinson

I was privileged to attend the 2013 Japanese American National Museum conference in Seattle. It commemorated the 25th anniversary of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, granting surviving Japanese Americans redress for their wartime confinement. The conference was a concentrated and rather intense experience, for a number of reasons.


After Camp, Canadian Style: The Japanese Canadian Post War Experience Conference - Part 2 of 2

Greg Robinson

Read Part 1 >>

One hint as to the prevailing spirit was that during the day several different people spoke of working in Jewish firms, which were the only ones that did not practice discrimination, or compared their experience with Jewish friends and classmates (Frank Moritsugu spoke of being hired in ...

After Camp, Canadian style: The Japanese Canadian Post War Experience Conference - Part 1 of 2

Greg Robinson

At the first Japanese Canadian Heritage Committee conference I attended, back in 2010, I was invited to come on the night before the main event and give a warmup with some historical background. At the Keisho conference last year, I was asked to attend and then speak about my reflections ...

Dateline Toronto: the Keisho Conference Commemorating the 70th Anniversary of Japanese Canadian Internment

Greg Robinson

On the weekend of March 31-April 1, I traveled to Toronto to attend the Keisho Conference at the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre. The conference, organized by the Heritage Committee of the JCCC (with help from Sedai, the Japanese Canadian Legacy Project) was designed to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Japanese ...

Nisei Journalists and the Occupation of China: Buddy Uno and Bill Hosokawa Compared - Part 3 or 3

Greg Robinson

Read Part 2 >>

In 1995, a conference on the Japanese American experience was held at Northwest College in Powell, Wyoming. Among the conference speakers were historian Yuji Ichioka, who presented a paper on Buddy Uno, and Hosokawa. According to surviving tapes of the sessions, Ichioka asserted during his presentation that ...

Nisei Journalists and the Occupation of China: Buddy Uno and Bill Hosokawa Compared - Part 2 of 3

Greg Robinson

Read Part 1 >>

Kumpei William Hosokawa was born in Seattle on January 30, 1915. Although he did not begin speaking English until he went to kindergarten, he developed an early interest in reading and sports. He excelled in basketball, and later helped found a local Nisei basketball league.  Like many ...

Nisei Journalists and the Occupation of China: Buddy Uno and Bill Hosokawa Compared - Part 1 of 3

Greg Robinson

One of the difficulties of doing Japanese American history is maintaining a balanced perspective in the face of politically and ideologically-charged debates. Many chroniclers of Japanese Americans, in trying to debunk racist wartime images of Nisei as disloyal and pro-Japanese, have perhaps gone rather too far in the other direction.


THE GREAT UNKNOWN AND THE UNKNOWN GREAT—The life and times of Hisaye Yamamoto: writer, activist, speaker

Greg Robinson

Hisaye Yamamoto, who died on Jan. 30, 2011 at the age of 89, remains known primarily as a literary artist, a crafter of powerful short fiction—such as her signature stories “Seventeen Syllables” and “Yoneko’s Earthquake”—as well as assorted newspaper columns. Yet the story of her development as ...

Parallel Wars: Japanese American and Japanese Canadian Internment Films - Part 2

Greg Robinson

Part 1 >> 


Login or Register to join our Nima-kai

About

I am a native New Yorker who is Professor of History at l'Université du Québec À Montréal, a French-language institution in Montreal, Canada. In addition to writing multiple books on Japanese American and Japanese Caandian history, I write the regular historical column "The Great Unknown" for the NICHI BEI WEEKLY newspaper.

Nikkei interests

  • community history
  • Japantowns

IMMEDIATE NEED FOR PART-TIME WEB DEVELOPER

Help us continue to develop the Discover Nikkei website.

Apply now!

Itadakimasu 2! Another Taste of Nikkei Culture

Submissions accepted until September 30.

Get updates

Sign up for email updates

Journal feed
Events feed
Comments feed

Support this project

Discover Nikkei

Discover Nikkei is a place to connect with others and share the Nikkei experience. To continue to sustain and grow this project, we need your help!

Ways to help >>

A project of the Japanese American National Museum

Major support by The Nippon Foundation