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Nima-kai Hinamatsuri Traditions

Licensing

Share your Nikkei Hinamatsuri photos!

March 3rd is celebrated annually in Japan and in Nikkei communities around the world as Hinamatsuri (Girl’s Day). Literally translated as “doll festival,” families with young daughters celebrate this event by displaying hina-ningyo, special dolls for the occasion. There are also special foods associated with Hinamatsuri such as hishimochi, chirashi-zushi, and hina-arare.

Discover Nikkei is compiling photos to share our global Nikkei community’s Hinamatsuri traditions. We want to see photos of your family’s special dolls, foods, and other traditional (or non-traditional) decorations and celebrations. Photos can be from past years or to share how you are finding ways to celebrate this year despite the pandemic.

To participate, just email us your photo to editor@DiscoverNikkei.org (see instructions below)! A selection of the photos will also be presented on the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center (JACCC) website through mid-March.

We recommend you use the slideshow view to check out the photos shared by our Nima-kai community.

Submission Guidelines

Please note we will only accept images related to Hinamatsuri celebrations. All photos must be submitted to editor@discovernikkei.org by March 12, 2021 to be included in this special project. Multiple submissions are accepted.

In addition to the photo, each submission requires the information below:
  1. Name and location of the person who is submitting the image
  2. A title for the image
  3. A brief description of the image—please tell us what the photo is of and why it is significant to you.
      - Recommended length: approximately 100 words.
      - Accepted Languages: English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese.
  4. Photo credit (Please only submit images for which you either own the copyright or have secured permission to use for this purpose) . Note that the copyright for a professionally-taken photograph is typically retained by the photographer unless they have specifically assigned you the copyright.

Image specifications:
   • Acceptable format: .jpg, .gif, or .png files
   • Preferred Size: 150 dpi, at least 1200 pixels wide

If you are not able to resize the image, email us the larger file and we can do it for you. Please note that if the photo is smaller than 450 pixels, we may not be able to use it on our site.

By submitting your photo(s), you are representing that you own the copyright to the photo(s) or otherwise have been granted permission to have the photo(s) shared in this way, and you are granting permission for us to share it on the Discover Nikkei website, JACCC website, and for promotional purposes in conjunction with this project (including JANM, JACCC, and Discover Nikkei’s websites, emails, and social media).

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at editor@DiscoverNikkei.org.

Celebrate Hinamatsuri with us!

If you’ve never celebrated Hinamatsuri, here are two opportunities coming up for those in the Los Angeles area or virtually from anywhere! The Japanese American National Museum (JANM) is presenting a virtual, interactive chirashi-zushi cooking workshop with Azusa Oda on February 27 (sign up here) so you can cook along from wherever you are! The JACCC is offering chirashi-zushi, cha-soba, and origami kits (with instructions on video starting 2/27) for pick-up in Little Tokyo (Los Angeles) on February 27 (details here). Participate in the JACCC and JANM’s events and share your photos with us!

Presented in collaboration with the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center and Japanese American National Museum.

Slides in this album 

Hina-ningyo from Childhood

Submitted by: Jane Shohara Matsumoto (Los Angeles, California, USA)

This doll set was purchased by my mother when I was a young child in Tokyo Japan. I was born in Tokyo while my dad was stationed there with the US Army, and later for the American government. My father knew ...

Hina-ningyo from Childhood
Contributed by: editor

Heirloom O-Hinasan Set from Iris Teragawa

Submitted by: Japanese American Cultural & Community Center (Los Angeles, California, USA)

This amazing Hina-ningyo set was donated to the JACCC by Iris Teragawa. Her father was an early founding Board member of the Center.

When Iris was presented with this heirloom, she annually set it up in her ...

Heirloom O-Hinasan Set from Iris Teragawa
Contributed by: JACCC

Hinamatsuri in Hawaii

Submitted by: Alice Nakagawa (Mililani, Hawaii, United States)

This is a photo of my daughter when she was in grade school. It's significant because this is the same Hina doll display I grew up with when I lived in Southern California.

Hinamatsuri in Hawaii
Contributed by: editor

Hinaningyo do Pavilhão Japonês

Enviado por Museu Histórico da Imigração Japonesa no Brasil (São Paulo, Brasil)

O símbolo do Hina matsuri é o Hinadan, no acervo do pavilhão há um belo exemplar desta peça, com cerca de 1,60 m de altura, que chamava a atenção de todos os visitantes.

Durante os dias 15 e ...

Hinadan - Hina Matsuri 2008
Contributed by: mhijb

Hina Ningyo of Konishi Family, Kyoto

Submitted by: Jane Shohara Matsumoto (Los Angeles, California, USA) via Yuko Shimizu (Fushimi, Kyoto, Japan)

Photo 1 of 3: Hina Ningyo of Konishi Famiy, Kyoto

My friend was a T.A. at UCLA's Japanese Language department when I first met her. After I graduated, we stayed in contact as she continued ...

Hina Ningyo of Konishi Family, Kyoto
Contributed by: editor

Hina Ningyo (Emperor & Empress) of Konishi Family, Kyoto

Submitted by: Jane Shohara Matsumoto (Los Angeles, California, USA) via Yuko Shimizu (Fushimi, Kyoto, Japan)

Photo 2 of 3: Hina Ningyo (Emperor & Empress) of Konishi Family, Kyoto

My friend was a T.A. at UCLA's Japanese Language department when I first met her. After I graduated, we stayed in contact as ...

Hina Ningyo (Emperor & Empress) of Konishi Family, Kyoto
Contributed by: editor

Hina Ningyo (close-up) of Konishi Family, Kyoto

Submitted by: Jane Shohara Matsumoto (Los Angeles, California, USA) via Yuko Shimizu (Fushimi, Kyoto, Japan)

Photo 3 of 3: Hina Ningyo (Close-up) of Konishi Family, Kyoto

My friend was a T.A. at UCLA's Japanese Language department when I first met her. After I graduated, we stayed in contact as she ...

Hina Ningyo (close-up) of Konishi Family, Kyoto
Contributed by: editor

Family heirloom: O-hina-san set

Submitted by Kyoko Oshiro (Monterey Park, California, USA)

Two sisters, Melody and Kate, living here in SoCal each have elaborate family heirlooms that they display yearly at Hinamatsuri. Gifted from family in Japan.

Family heirloom: O-hina-san set
Contributed by: editor

Family heirlooms - O-hina-san set & craft project

Submitted by: Kyoko Oshiro (Los Angeles, California, USA)

Next to the family heirloom O-hina-san set are charming children’s craft project made for Hinamatsuri

Family heirlooms - O-hina-san set & craft project
Contributed by: editor

Working My Way to the Top

Submitted by: Grace Kawahira (Mountain View, California, USA)

This picture was taken when I was a 1 year old in 1962 in Los Angeles. It was a precursor to a few unexpected adventures I would have in my life!

Photo credit: Hideo Kawahira

Working My Way to the Top
Contributed by: editor

Throwback to Hinamatsuri at JANM!

Submitted by: Joy Yamaguchi (Long Beach, California, USA)

This is my friend, Emily, and me at JANM in front of a display of hina-ningyo in (I think!) 1999. With the name tags we're wearing, it looks like we just visited the museum exhibition so it's a fun full circle to be able ...

Throwback to Hinamatsuri at JANM!
Contributed by: editor

Snoopy Hina-ningyo set + guest

Submitted by: Megan Kuroki (Torrance, California, USA)

My mom saw this set in a shop window in Tokyo decades ago while biking home after grocery shopping. As she tells it, she pedaled furiously home, threw the groceries in the fridge, turned around and pedaled back to the shop, where she ...

Snoopy Hina-ningyo set + guest
Contributed by: editor

Album Type

online exhibition

editor — Last modified Mar 01 2021 11:18 p.m.


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A project of the Japanese American National Museum

Major support by The Nippon Foundation