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Japanese American History from Early Immigration to Present Time

nicolemyoung
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Immigration: The Picture Bride Era

1908-1924- After the Gentleman’s Agreement was put into action in 1907, Male laborers found it difficult to find wives, therefore the Picture Bride practice became a popular way in which a male laborer was able to marry, and a Japanese women would be able to immigrate to America. First, a headshot of the man was sent back to Japan to his parents or a broker and a bride was matched with the man by the broker. A marriage by proxy is conducted and the marriage is registered and the “wife” applies for a visa. An estimated 20,000 picture brides came to the U.S. between 1908-1924. Upon the arrival of the Picture Brides to the United States, many found that their new husbands were many years older than they appeared in the photograph they sent of themselves. Many picture brides were completely unaware of the difficulties they faced having to adjust to their new American lifestyle of working on sugar plantations in Hawaii or running

Based on this original

Picture Bride 1932
uploaded by CSUNAsianAmericanStudies
Photograph contributed by Bill Watanabe. Names of people: Katsuye Furayama, Densaku Furayama, and two members of the Watanabe family Date: 1932 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii U.S.A. Photograph by: Unknown Photo size: ... More »


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