Nikkei Chronicles #10—Nikkei Generations: Connecting Families & Communities

The theme of the 10th edition of Nikkei Chronicles—Nikkei Generations: Connecting Families & Communities—takes a look at intergenerational relationships in Nikkei communities around the world, with a particular focus on the emerging younger generations of Nikkei and how they connect (or don’t) with their roots and with older generations. 

Discover Nikkei solicited stories related to Nikkei Generations from May to September 2021. Voting closed on November 8, 2021. We received 31 stories (21 English; 2 Japanese; 3 Spanish; and 7 Portuguese) from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Peru, and the US, with a few submitted in multiple languages.

An editorial committee chose a favorite story in each language. In addition, a Nima-kai favorite was determined by online community voting. Here are the selections! (*Translations of the selected stories are currently in progress.)

Editorial Committee’s Favorites

Nima-kai Favorite:

To learn more about this writing project >>

* This series is presented in partnership with: 

        ASEBEX

   

 

Check out these other Nikkei Chronicles series >> 

identity pt

Ojiichans

There was a time when we drank soft drinks out of glass bottles. Before the reckless use of disposable plastic, you went to the beverage supplier with a crate filled with empty containers and exchanged them for full bottles. My grandfather always bought the individual green bottles of guarana, leaving them in the fridge while waiting for the visit of his grandchildren. The hissing sound of the carbonation as the bottle opener removed the cap still takes me back to that kitchen, while still a girl next to that strong man who barely spoke the same language as me, but …

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community ja

ブラジル二世第1号の人

珍しく早起きしてソファで血圧を計っていると電話が鳴った。早朝に電話がなるのはお葬式の知らせと決まっているので、恐る恐る受話器を取る。

「オレオレ、まだ寝てた?」

アチバイアに住むさくら丸同船者の三木路生(みちお)さんだった。

「聞いて驚くな!」

人をビックリさせるあの独特の抑揚。同船者で病気の人って誰だっけ?それとも元気な人が事故か何かで?早く教えて!

向こうもじれったいのか「聞いて驚くなかれ!昨日、珍しい人に会ったよ」と切り出した。

アー、誰も死ななくて良かったと安堵する。

三木さんは続けて、「第1回移民船笠戸丸移民の二世第1号の人だよ」と自慢げな声だ。なんだかんだと説明があって、「君にこの事を新聞に…

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community es

Los impactos socioculturales de la inmigración japonesa en el Perú

¿Cómo ha influido la inmigración japonesa en la sociedad peruana? La hipótesis de esta investigación es que la inmigración japonesa al Perú ha influido socioculturalmente a través de aportes, costumbres y hábitos que se mantienen en nuestra vida cotidiana hasta la actualidad.

1. CONSECUENCIAS SOCIALES DE LA INMIGRACIÓN JAPONESA

Discriminación hacia los descendientes japoneses

La discriminación hacia los descendientes japoneses se ha dado desde la época de la Inmigración Japonesa al Perú hasta la actualidad. A medida que la comunidad japonesa crecía, los peruanos comenzaron a ver a los japoneses como una amenaza. Se inició un sentimiento de inquietud que …

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culture en

Passing on the Joy of Being Nikkei

I love obon. Standing under strings of chochin, their warm light dotting indigo summer skies like fireflies always feels like coming home. They transform a liminal space — a street or a parking lot — into a destination. Hot dogs and hamburgers coexist with ikebana and enka without question. For just a few hours, all of me makes sense. Of all the Nikkei traditions I grew up with, this was the one I most wanted to share with my child.

The 2020 pandemic had other plans.

Covid precautions quickly made clear that my child’s first obon would …

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identity en

Hardship and happiness: A New Zealand war bride’s life — Hiroko Kadowaki, 1929-2021

June Baldwin and her son Leon reflect on their mother and grandmother, Hiroko Kadowaki, who migrated to New Zealand in 1956 after marrying a New Zealand soldier she’d met in Hiroshima.

* * * * *

JUNE (Nisei):

My mother, Hiroko, grew up on the small island of Daikonshima in the middle of a lake in Matsue City, Shimane prefecture, on the north-west coast of Japan. She was the third of four children. Her parents farmed their land. Mum often talked about their fruit orchard and soy beans, and how they made their own soy sauce and silk.

Mum dreamed …

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Tags

Australia Brazil culture discrimination family grandfather Hiroko Kadowaki Kasato-maru Korean War Migration New Zealand NikkeiGenerations Nisei obon Peru value War Brides