COPANI & KNT (2007)

This is a series of reports and presentations from the Joint Convention of COPANI & KNT held July 18 - 21, 2007 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

community en es pt

Contemporary Issues Facing Japanese American Communities

Today, a number of challenges face the Japanese American communities in the United States. At the core of these challenges is the fact that Japanese American communities have become increasingly complex, dispersed and diverse. No longer can we neatly define the Japanese American community by generations – Issei, Nisei, Sansei -- who share common beliefs and historical experiences. Previous definitions of what constitutes a “Japanese American” now seem totally inadequate as one-out-of-three Japanese American is of mixed ethnic or racial heritage, and the new post-WWII immigration of “Shin Issei,” or “New Issei” born in Japan and their American-born Nisei children, have increased ...

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migration en es pt

Current Issues regarding the Brazilian Migration to Japan

In my presentation, I’ll discuss the migration of Japanese-Brazilians to Japan, a process that has led to significant changes in the lives of a growing segment of the Nikkei population in Brazil, as well as in Japan.

Since the early ‘90s, a growing number of Brazilians of Japanese ancestry and their families, with Brazilians descendent from other nationalities, have taken part in the “coming and going” Brazil-Japan route, looking for a better living conditions searching for a dream of technological modernity as reflected in the image of a powerful and rich Japan. That migration stems from the desire to ...

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community en es pt

Japanese-Brazilians: Past and Present

The history of Japanese immigration to Brazil begins in 1908, with the arrival of the first immigrants officially recognized as such by the Brazilian government. From then on, the road would be long and at times quite convoluted.

The first major obstacle was the immigrants’ total ignorance about Brazil. The Japanese knew nothing about the country to where they were moving, except that it was located far away and that there were stories claiming it was easy to get rich here. By the same token, the Brazilians knew precious little about the Japanese. This is one aspect of the issue ...

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migration en es pt

Chile and Japanese Migration - Part 2

>> Part 1

The Unique Japanese Community in Chile

The descriptor, “Japanese community in Chile,” does not appear to be an aphorism that does not correspond with Chilean reality. In Chile there never was, nor has been a “Japanese community” like that found in Peru, Brazil, Mexico, or in other countries where there was official emigration. The opportunities that these Japanese emigrants found in Chile did not allow for the formation of a Japanese “conglomerate” that could achieve cohesion and permanence. The closest they ever came to such a concept was achieved by small groups of two or three families that ...

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migration en es pt

Chile and Japanese Migration – Part 1

Introduction

Japan gave impetus to begin migration when it ended the “sakoku” of three centuries, achieved rapprochement with other nations through the signing of Treaties of Friendship and Trade (Japan had signed such a treaty with Chile in 1897), and encouraged the “dekasegi” in order to alleviate, in part, the high social drama with which the bulk of the population lived. Under direct government auspices, thousands of families responded to the call and dispersed throughout the world in search of employment that Japan was unable to offer. Much of this official migration ended up in the Americas.

Not all countries ...

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