Edward Yoshida

Edward Yoshida is a husband, father, JANM/Discover Nikkei volunteer, and a project analyst at a regional engineering firm. He grew up in Los Angeles and Orange County before attending college back East. In his spare time, he enjoys exercising and spending quality time with his family.

Updated June 2015

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Author Hiroshi Kashiwagi: From Togan Soup to Plums Can Wait and Beyond, the Life of an American

“Why was I, an American citizen, thrown in prison without cause, without due process? I had registered for the draft, as required of citizens of my age and sex in 1942; why were they questioning my loyalty now? How could they do that? … If they restored my status as a rightful citizen, let me go free, out of this prison, I would do anything required of me. Why should I answer the questions?”

Regarding the loyalty questionnaire, or registration, such were the thoughts of a bright young man forced to leave his life behind for insert-euphemism-here. No matter what the ...

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Author Lane Hirabayashi: A Family Affair - Part 2

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Perhaps the most important takeaway that we can apply to our own lives is how Gordon practiced what he preached. Combined with his Quaker membership and his early roots observing the honesty and integrity of his parents and other cooperative members, Gordon masterfully walked the fine line of not only being unapologetic for his beliefs, but also not being disrespectful of others who either did not share his beliefs or complied with the WWII orders and joined the draft anyway. Evidenced by so many non-Japanese Americans to whom Gordon was so dear, to his interactions with prisoners ...

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Japanese American National Museum Store Online

Author Lane Hirabayashi: A Family Affair - Part 1

“Let me add, however, that in refusing to register, I am well aware of the excellent qualities of the army and government personnel connected with the prosecution of this exclusion order. They are men of the finest type, and I sincerely appreciate their sympathetic and honest efforts. Nor do I intend to cast any shadow upon the Japanese and the other Nisei who have registered for evacuation. They have faced tragedy admirably. I am objecting to the principle of this order, which denies the rights of human beings, including citizens.”

 —Gordon Hirabayashi, May 13, 1942

This ability to separate the ...

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Author Mark H. Rawitsch: More Than Just a House

“I won’t sell. You can murder me, you can throw me into the sea, and I won’t sell.”

Mr. Jukichi Harada’s sharp yet courageous response was unlikely to be the type of exchange he envisioned carrying on with his American neighbors when he left Japan permanently in 1903, never to see his parents, brother, or sisters again. For Issei, such as Mr. Harada, who were ineligible for U.S. citizenship, owning a building or land became that much more significant in representing a long-term, if not permanent, stake in this country. Unfortunately, having the state of California ...

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Author Dr. Cherstin M. Lyon: Honoring Footsteps in the Sands of Time

Gordon Hirabayashi patiently sat in a jail cell as military officials discussed what to do with him. He had refused to register for relocation to Tule Lake, and yet the military could not allow him to stay in Seattle. Hirabayashi suggested that the military forcibly remove him to the regional assembly center so that the military would be in compliance with the exclusion order and he did not have to betray his conscience by obeying a racially discriminatory law that was unconstitutional. He was surprised and a bit amused when they told him that they could not forcibly remove him ...

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