Fredrick Cloyd

  • en

Fredrick Douglas Kakinami Cloyd was born in Japan shortly after the U.S. Occupation officially ended. His African-American/Cherokee father was an occupation soldier in Korea and Japan while Fredrick’s mother—a Japanese/Chinese/Austro-Hungarian girl of the war-ruins was from an elite nationalist family in Japan. Transnational racisms and sexisms during the rise of U.S. and Japanese global stature presents a foundation through which Fredrick weaves his stories of memory and family history.

He received a masters degree from a postcolonial/feminist-oriented social cultural anthropology program at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco. He feeds his love of Asian and Latin foods, coffee, TV shows, music, and steam trains while working on his first interstitial auto-ethnography entitled: “Dream of the Water Children, dream of the water children.”

Updated May 2011

Articles by Fredrick Cloyd

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 6: Constant King [2 of 2]

Fredrick Cloyd

Read “Part 6: Constant King [1 of 2]” >>

How, then, are manhood, fatherhood and hierarchies constructed in this? It’s not just one thing.

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 6: Constant King [1 of 2]

Fredrick Cloyd

Read “Part 5: Monsters” >>

The Constant King 1964

Mama and Dad and myself are at the dinner table. It was really the first full year ever, that Dad sat at the dinner table with Mama and I for a meal or two. In the past, he had been out of ...

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 5: Monsters

Fredrick Cloyd

Read “Part 4: Neighbors/Next Door” >>

Monsters 1950    Shōwa Year 25

化け物    昭和25年

From a leaflet from the U.S. armed forces made available to the occupation soldiers during the strongest period of attempting to implement the anti-fraternization policy which tried to discourage relations between Japanese women and occupation personnel:

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 4: Neighbors/Next door

Fredrick Cloyd

Read “Part 3: Watermelon Seeds [2 of 2]” >>

Neighbors/Next door, Mama around 1940

となり、昭和15年ごろ

“These expressions are extremely crude and regional, and have a rustic air; middle-class Tokyo residents would laugh at their provincial quaintness.”
     —Dorinne Kondo1

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 3: Watermelon Seeds [2 of 2]

Fredrick Cloyd

Read “Part 3: Watermelon Seeds [1 of 2]” >>

I am still an only-child. But now my only child identity was not the same as just a moment before. I was born alone but because a sister died. Fragments of unknowns become apparent. I then felt relieved. Some things fell into ...

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 3: Watermelon Seeds [1 of 2]

Fredrick Cloyd

Read “Part 2: The Waters [2 of 2]” >>

Watermelon seeds, 1964    Shōwa Year 39

スイカの種、1964年    昭和39年

“One of the remarkable features of this group is that it seems that all the war children receives[sic] a stigma, whether the father was an enemy soldier or an allied…We have ...

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 2: The Waters [2 of 2]

Fredrick Cloyd

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The Waters (continued)

Denver, Colorado 1982

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 2: The Waters [1 of 2]

Fredrick Cloyd

Read “Part 1: Preface” >>

The Waters

“What am I doing here in this endless winter?”
     —Franz Kafka, from The Metamorphosis and Other Stories

Excerpts from "Dream of the water children, dream of the water children"

Part 1: Preface

Fredrick Cloyd

This is an anthropology of memory, a journal and memoir, a work of creative non-fiction. It combines memories from recall, conversations with parents and other relations, friends, journal entries, dream journals and critical analysis.

Nikkei Heritage

Snowflakes in a Valley of Fire

Fredrick Cloyd

My mother told me one day that fear was useless in her life. Her statements confront what many of us believe peace should be—obedience, disciplining ourselves to be docile, good citizens, with fear not far behind our actions. Fear of not being seen as an American, fear of being ...

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