Anna K. Stahl

Anna K. Stahl is the daughter of Mr and Mrs Stahl, a mixed-race couple, half Caucasian and half Japanese. Anna is a fiction writer and a literature/writing professor based in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and writing in the Spanish language. Her fiction and analytical essays often explore cross-cultural experiences; her work is recognized as a new voice for this theme in the Spanish language. She is married to a South American, and they have a young daughter who continues (and indeed expands) the multicultural dynamic.

Updated April 2012

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The Asian American Literary Review

Asian American Literature Forum Response by Anna Kazumi Stahl - Part 3

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Now, to return to the issue posed in this forum’s prompt: in my case, I must try to find an instance in which both a generational difference and a national-cultural one revealed their criteria and influence. And there was a specific instance, an event I participated in several years ago, in 2004, for the “Japan Theme Day” at the Buenos Aires International Book Fair. I was invited together with an Argentine Nisei, Maximiliano Matayoshi, a talented young novelist who was then just over twenty. By this I mean to indicate that Maximiliano Matayoshi would pertain to ...

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The Asian American Literary Review

Asian American Literature Forum Response by Anna Kazumi Stahl - Part 2

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To get back to the prompt this forum is based on, I answer that I do see a parallelism between those expansions in an Asian American literature’s aesthetic/stylistic reach and that 1980s Presidential apology to Japanese Americans (although those $20,000 checks remain a bit of a thorn, and most pooled the money for monuments and programs that would keep the memory of those ten internment camps alive for future generations).

Those were the kinds of things that happened in my generation’s early adulthood.

Certainly, they were momentous revelations. But to me, on a ...

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The Asian American Literary Review

Asian American Literature Forum Response by Anna Kazumi Stahl - Part 1

“Are there any continuities,” wonders scholar Min Hyoung Song, “between the earlier generation of writers which first raised the banner of an Asian American literature and a later generation of writers which inherited it?” The Asian American Literary Review asked writers to respond to this question for their Spring 2012 issue on “Generations.”

Forum Response by Anna Kazumi Stahl

Given that I was born to a mixed race couple (Japanese and German) in the Deep South in 1963, I grew up in a context of rock-throwing, name-calling racism, explicit and publicly allowed. Of course, these attitudes were even then abhorred ...

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The Cajun Nikkei - Part 5 of 5

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Stahl Family:

The Stahl family was one of the few families in the community that was of mixed race. Mr. Stahl, Earl, was a native of northern Louisiana, from rural areas around Shreveport. He was relatively typical for the region, the grandson of European farming immigrants-in his case from Germany-who had come to the US at the turn of the century in search of better opportunities.

The unusual thing about Earl Stahl was that, as a young architecture student at Tulane University, he became part of a growing interest that certain American architects like Frank Lloyd Wright ...

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The Cajun Nikkei - Part 4 of 5

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Tamai family:

Until the 1990s, there was only one Japanese market in the Greater New Orleans area, and that was Oriental Merchandise. It served as an informal social gathering place for the Nikkei of New Orleans. Frank Tamai and George Hirabayashi ran the import/wholesale business originally called Oriental Trading.

While the main business was selling Asian goods to retailers, as well as Mardi Gras throws to krewe members, off to one side was a barely noticeable door that lead to a spanking clean, one room shop. In that room was the only place in the New ...

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