Susan Osa

Susan Osa is a marketing/communications professional with experience on projects ranging from print, web/new media, to environmental graphics. She has been a volunteer with the Japanese American National Museum since 2001.

Updated April 2008

media en

Up for Grabs

Throughout history, there have been a number of great rivalries, some fun (“blondes vs. brunettes”), some serious (“Hatfields vs. McCoys”), and some somewhere in between (“PC vs. Mac”). However, many of the greatest rivalries stem from the sports world—Ali vs. Frazier, Celtics vs. Lakers, Dodgers vs. Giants—with genuine angst and emotion that spills over to the fans. On October 7, 2001, when Barry Bonds crushed home run #73 towards McCovey Cove at PacBell Park in San Francisco, an absurd new rivalry was born: Popov vs. Hayashi.

Webster’s dictionary defines a rivalry as a “competition; the act of ...

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sports en

Japanese American National Museum Store Online

October Moments: Celebrating the History of Nisei Baseball

With spring season in bloom, the timeless beauty and classic traditions of another baseball season takes center stage on fields across America. As a young boy growing up in Los Angeles, Peter Chen idolized Steve Garvey of the Los Angeles Dodgers, and was inspired by the beauty of the sport. As a successful artist, he has woven his love of baseball with his creative talents to celebrate baseball history.

As a second-generation Asian American, Peter Chen always enjoyed drawing, painting, and the arts. After studying architecture at UC Berkeley, he decided to teach in hopes of empowering urban youth through ...

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culture en

Japanese American National Museum Store Online

Hinamatsuri in the United States

Hinamatsuri literally translates as Doll Festival, but is often referred to as Girl’s Day. Celebrated annually on March 3, families pray for the happiness and prosperity of their girls, helping to ensure they grow up healthy and beautiful. On this day, families with young daughters celebrate this event by displaying hina-ningyo, special dolls for the occasion. 

The presentation of the dolls can be traced back to the Edo Era (1603-1876) when it was used as a way to ward off evil spirits. In modern times, they are displayed more out of tradition than for use as lucky charms. The ...

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culture en

Japanese American National Museum Store Online

Gathering of Joy: A History of Japanese American Obon Festivals and Bon Odori

Obon is an annual Japanese Buddhist festival that commemorates the dead. It is based on a Buddhist text which describes how a devout monk dances with joy upon successfully releasing his deceased mother’s spirit from the Realm of Hungry Ghosts. Today, participants dance to express their joy to be living happily and to honor loved ones who have passed away. Obon is also commonly known as the Festival of Lanterns, referring to the traditional lighting of the chochin (lanterns) at family shrines and gravesites.

Obon is held outdoors during the summer months—in the street or in temple parking ...

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