Hawaii Hochi

Hawaii Hochi is a Japanese and English newspaper that is sold in Hawaii, USA. Founded in 1912, it is published six days a week.

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Fred Kinzaburo Makino: A Biography—His Contributions to Society through the Hawaii Hochi - Part 5

>> Part 4

Another Side of Makino

Makino’s life story offers a window to his strong personality.  Actually, he was a very compassionate human being, as exemplified over and over again by his actions.

While jailed at Oahu Prison for a few months during the 1909 strike, many of his supporters brought him food to eat, which he shared with three other inmates.  Mrs. Makino cooked his favorite foods and delivered them to the prison.  However, she never saw her husband.—not because she was prohibited from seeing him, but because Makino himself did not want to see her.  His ...

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Fred Kinzaburo Makino: A Biography—His Contributions to Society through the Hawaii Hochi - Part 4

>> Part 3

World War II and Its Aftermath

When Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor, hundreds of Japanese Americans were arrested as a threat to security and were sent to the concentration camps on the mainland.  Many people were surprised that Makino was not among them.  Actually, Makino was interrogated by the FBI a few times. But they could find nothing against him to warrant deporting him to the concentration camps.  Although Makino was known for his sharp criticism against social injustice, and for his anti-establishment stances, he had sound reason and basis for his actions.

Makino was a law-abiding citizen ...

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Fred Kinzaburo Makino: A Biography—His Contributions to Society through the Hawaii Hochi - Part 3

>> Part 2

Makino and the Hawai Hochi

In August 1938, Ryoka Yano wrote: 

The Hawaii Hochi always sided with Japanese immigrants.  Fred Kinzaburo Makino never sought money or power.  He always expressed his ideas, no matter how difficult the situation was.  Therefore, sometimes Makino’s intentions were misunderstood, and he was chastised by society.  But he never changed his way, pursuing his ideals and, in the end, he succeeded in convincing people.  This was the way of The Hawaii Hochi from its beginnings until today.”

A quick look at back issues of the Hochi would verify Yano’s comments:

  • Five ...

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Fred Kinzaburo Makino: A Biography—His Contributions to Society through the Hawaii Hochi - Part 2

>> Part 1

The Establishment of the Hawaii Hochi

The 1909 strike resulted in a major upheaval of Honolulu’s Japanese language newspaper. Previously, the Hawaii Shimpo was the Islands largest Japanese paper, followed by the Hawaii Nichinichi Shimbun and the Nippu Jiji. However, because of the strike, the Nippu Jiji became the largest newspaper, as it supported the plantation workers, while the Shimpo and Nichinichi supported the HSPA.

However, shortly after that, Yasutaro Soga, publisher and the president of the Nippu Jiji, apparently changed his views and began to support the sugar companies. In his editorials, he urged the plantation ...

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Fred Kinzaburo Makino: A Biography—His Contributions to Society through the Hawaii Hochi - Part 1

Early Childhood

Fred Kinzaburo Makino was born on August 28, 1877 in Yokohama, Japan. His father, Joseph Higgenbotham, was a merchant/trader from Manchester, England. His mother was Kin Makino from Kanagawa Perfecture, Japan. His father died in September 1881, when Kinzaburo was only 4 years old. Although children of mixed marriages were rare in the Japan of the 1880s, Makino was able to grow up without too many problems, thanks to his mother’s warm love and to the fact that Yokohama was an international port city with more than its share of foreigners.

Not much is known about ...

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