Paraguayan with a Japanese face (Spanish)

Defining "Nikkei" through lineage and community involvement (Spanish) The term Nikkei reflects ties to Japan (Spanish) Japanese language education for Paraguayan Nisei (Spanish) Treatment of Japanese Paraguayans during World War II (Spanish) Inclusiveness of the first Japanese colony in Paraguay (Spanish) Nikkei contributions to Paraguayan agriculture (Spanish) Paraguayan with a Japanese face (Spanish)

Transcripts available in the following languages:

(Spanish) In reality there’s a clash, because there are two different ways of thinking. One is the Christian way that has its rules, they’re dogmatic, they don’t tend to work so much either because they’re descended from the Spanish. They like to celebrate more, they like being that way(?) or being in charge. But, the Japanese aren’t like that. Still, little by little, not with the first generation, but more or less with the second, and the third generation is already pretty well integrated into the Paraguayan community. I even surveyed some young people before coming here and they said, “I feel Japanese.” That’s what one Japanese kid said: “I feel Japanese.” But the important thing is to maintain the good qualities of the Japanese, even though you are a Paraguayan. And you would do, you would work for your country, which is Paraguay. Me myself, as a Nisei, I would say that too. I have a Japanese face, but my heart is Paraguayan. If I was asked to choose where I had to give my life, I would choose Paraguay.

Date: October 7, 2005
Location: California, US
Interviewer: Ann Kaneko
Contributed by: Watase Media Arts Center, Japanese American National Museum

identity nikkei Paraguay

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